top 10 NEW magazines for kids and family

new magazines for kids and family | teachmama.com

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new magazines for kids and family | teachmama.com

Friends, did you know that magazines truly count as worthwhile reading material and that they’ve come a long way in the past few years?

They do, and they have.

And also? Magazines pretty much rock.  They:

  • make super holiday or birthday gifts for children;
  • make awesome classroom donations for teachers;
  • can be a great way to offer support for preschools or daycare centers;
  • make fabulous partners for travel, waiting areas, or rest time;
  • give kids quick and engaging reading material any time of the day.

And, not surprisingly, magazines exist for just about any age group and interest.

It’s kind of funny how this post came about, but essentially, after a bit of poking around today, I’ve come across a ton of really cool new-to-me magazines. Magazines that made me do a double-take and magazines that I really, truly think my kids would love.

Here’s the skinny. .  .

Top 10 Magazines for Kids and Family:

http---www.discountmags.com-shopimages-products-normal-extra-National-Geographic-Little-Kids

National Geographic Kids: For ages 6 and up, this magazine is full of photos, fun facts, and articles for animal-loving kids!  Tiny posters, games, and more will keep your kids reading (and learning!). And the digital edition is awesome.  For littler guys? National Geographic Little Kids.

 

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Muse: Tons of articles on science, nature, math, physics, space, and earth science, Muse magazine will keep curious kids engaged and interested and STEM-focused all month long.

http---www.discountmags.com-shopimages-products-normal-extra-i-5490-1415203918-zoobooks

Zoobooks: Each issue of the Zoobooks magazine focuses on one animal, bird, reptile, or insect. And each issue contains tons of info on that guy–articles, games, photos, and more. Though Zoobooks is geared toward children ages 6-12 years, it’s younger sibling, Zootles, is for preschoolers.

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Faces: Children age 9 and older will learn about the world around them with Faces. Each month, a different culture is highlighted, and readers get a chance to learn firsthand about a group’s customs, habits, tales, history, and traditions. Faces is a great way to make this big world seem a little bit smaller.

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BYOU: For ages 10 and older, BYOU (Be Your Own You) magazine is all about raising young girls’ self esteem; the content focuses on positive role models for girls, quizzes, puzzles, games, crafts, articles, and more. There’s a full digital edition and even online events that subscribers are invited to attend. Sounds cool!

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Discovery Girls: Created for girls, by girls, Discovery Girls offers articles, advice, inspiration, and a feature called ‘Embarrassing Moments’ which young girls really seem to like.  It does seem to hit on a slightly older audience, maybe 10-13 years.

Sports Illustrated for Kids: Tweens and young teens will love this sports-focused magazine because it is humorous and informative, and it offers a ‘behind-the-scenes’ look at some of the most popular current sports figures.  Each issue includes cool little sports cards that can be pulled apart, saved, or traded. Owen loves this magazine, especially for the cool online extensions.

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Yum Food & Fun for Kids Magazine: This is definitely on the holiday-gift list for Maddy, Owen, and Cora. They love cooking, they love being in the kitchen, and they love trying new recipes, so I think this magazine which is

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Ask: This magazine for ages 7-10 focuses on arts and science and covers a wide variety of topics that kids naturally have questions about, like the human body, science, space, and more. Another one on my holiday gift list for my crew this year.

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Teen Graffiti: I’m intrigued by this magazine and think it really could be a great way to get kids writing creatively; it’s a magazine created by teens for teens, so though I’d definitely check it out before ordering a subscription, it sure seems cool for slightly older readers.

 

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Upfront: The New York Times Upfront Magazine sounds a lot like something I would have loved reading as a tween or teen. If my English teacher or history teacher introduced this to our class, we would have eaten it up. National and international news is covered, along with a regular feature on ethics–a topic every child should think about with regularity.

magazines for kids and family  teachmama.com long scholastic

Looking for something more content-specific? Consider something like Scholastic Math or Scholastic ArtAction (which is high interest content for lower-level readers) or Choices which offers high interest, discussion topics for teens.  these magazines or Scholastic’s Instructor are super additions to any child’s learning or classroom.

Totally worth talking to your child’s teacher about!

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There really are a ton of great magazines out there today–but don’t forget to revisit some old faves if these new ones don’t do it for you. 

Highlights High Five: Very similar in layout to its older sibling, Highlights for Children, Highlights High Five is simply geared toward a preschool audience. It’s a great way to get little guys ready for reading, looking forward to the mail, and feeling like they have something ‘just their size’ to read each month!

Highlights for Children: Children ages 6-11 will love this magazine which includes articles, puzzles, stories, and poems to keep kids challenged and thinking creatively.

We are huge, huge fans of Highlights and have even shared our Magazine Hunt Cards and Hidden Picture lunchbox notes.

 

 

What are your favorite magazines for kids and family? What should we add to this list? I’d love to know! Leave your ideas in the comments section below.

 

fyi: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Forever and always I recommend only products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” For more information, please see teachmama media, llc. disclosure policy.

budget challenge for students: real-life money management and big $ for classrooms and students

teach kids real life money management win grants and scholarships teachmama.com

 

teach kids real life money management win grants and scholarships  teachmama.com

 

Confession: for years and years I was the worst at balancing my checkbook.

I thought something might have been wrong with me that inevitably, month after month, I’d find myself in error.

Checks would bounce and payments would be late; it was often a mess.

A hot mess.

It was partly because I’d be lazy, or I’d forget, or I’d lose receipts.

Maybe it was because I started managing money too late–as a college freshman!–or maybe it was because math isn’t my thing. Either way, things are fine now but truly due in part to the fact that I married a man who moves much more slowly when it comes to money.

Thank goodness.

I made a promise to myself, though, that my kids would be better with money management than I. So we will start earlier. We will work together. And hopefully, they will move into their adult years as more financially savvy, more money-confident.

budget challenge for students: real-life money management and big $ for classrooms and students

(Yes–this is my for real check book from when I first graduated from college. It isn’t pretty.)

When I was contacted by my friends from We Are Teachers to work with the great people of H&R Block to share word of the H & R Block Budget Challenge, I was more than game.

The more families who support the H&R Block Budget Challenge and the more teachers who use the resources in their classrooms, the better. Truly.

Here’s the skinny. . .

Budget Challenge for Students: Real-Life Money Management and Big $ for Classrooms and Students:

It may sound a little complicated or (for some of you) scary. But hang in there. Keep on reading, my friend.

The H&R Block Budget Challenge is new to me, I’ll admit it. But it seems awesome. Awesome.

The challenge encourages kids to learn about personal finance in fun, authentic, and real ways.

And along the way there are prizes, scholarship money, and big-time classroom grants to be won.

budget challenge for students: real-life money management and big $ for classrooms and students

The H&R Block Budged Challenge has three components you need to know about:

They’ve got tons of parent resources. They’ve got tons of classroom resources. And they’ve got lots and lots of money to give to students and teachers.

 

Make your way to the site and then click on the tab that you need: 

budget challenge for students: real-life money management and big $ for classrooms and students

 

1. tons of awesome parent resources: any parent can use them for their own kids–check them out!

  • videos, facts and statistics
  • parent education resources
  • personal consumer resources for parents
  • career and college resources for parents
  • parents cannot do the challenge for

2. super-cool teacher and classroom resources: lesson plans and ideas that teachers will love, love, love.

Check it out:

3. scholarship and grant money: tons of it

Look at the info below!

budget challenge for students: real-life money management and big $ for classrooms and students

 

It’s awesome.

And as a gal who pored through college scholarship books (no joke–anyone who did the same thing knows how HUGE those books were and how laborious that process was!), this challenge–and the prizes it offers–are really remarkable.

The coolest thing? Even though it sounds corny, everyone who enters is a winner. The skills that students will walk away with after this challenge are invaluable.

For real.

HRB-Concept1-Twitter

Now what? 

HRB-Concept5-Twitter

 

Follow the WeAreTeachers / H&R Block Teaching About Money pinterest board:

Follow WeAreTeachers’s board Teaching About Money: H&R Block Dollars & Sense on Pinterest.

 

fyi: This post was written as part of a collaboration with WeAreTeachers.com and H&R Block. As always, all opinions are my own, influenced only by my experience as a parent and educator. 

teaching kids to say ‘thank you’ to everyday heroes

teach kids to thank everyday heroes teachmama.com


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teach kids to thank everyday heroes  teachmama.com

 

Too often those important people who do everyday jobs are forgotten.

Even though they work hard to make our days brighter and lives easier, many times days go by when they don’t get ample thanks. And they deserve it.

So our focus this week is to to just that–thank our everyday heroes.

We’re teaching our kids as frequently as we are able to say ‘thank you’ to the people who work hard every day, around them.

Here’s the skinny. . .

Teaching Kids to Say ‘Thank You’ to Everyday Heroes: 

Much like we did with our Surprise Notes for the Neighbors way back when, our Thank You Notes for Everyday Heroes will be the same: quick, easy cards of thanks.

 

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

Just simple tokens of gratitude for the people who do jobs all around us: the postal carrier, the delivery person, the newspaper deliverer, and the folks who work at our bank, dry cleaner, gas station, and grocery store.

Even though our teachers get recognized with Teacher Appreciation Week, our everyday heroes rarely get any regular thanks.

This is just one way that we, as parents, will do what we can to teach our kids workforce appreciation.

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

It’s simple. But it’s really powerful. Really!

 

The Thank You Notes for Everyday Heroes are here: 

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

You can download the pdf here: thank you brighten day notes _ teachmama.com

(Please, if you choose to share this–and we hope you do!–please link to this post instead of the attachment page. Thank you!)

 

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

We will simply put these cards in a small plastic bag, sign them with a smiley face and a first name, and hand them out as we need them. Keeping them in the car may be the best way to do it!

 

Here are a few ways to get started thinking about our everyday heroes: 

Check out the “1 in one hundred million” site–it’s a site created by Kronos that’s devoted to sharing the personal stories of people who do the many important and too-often unrecognized jobs upon which we all rely.

In these videos, ordinary people in the workforce share their stories. It’s a great resource to be used as a starting point for your kids.

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

teaching kids to say 'thank you' to everyday heroes | teachmama.com

Or depending on where in the world you live, the videos and resources may really give your kids a more clear sense of what kind of jobs are out there.

Each month “1 in one hundred million” site releases a new video profiling a person’s story. They’ve covered a firefighter, a trauma nurse, a produce manager at grocery store, a union electrician, a hotel front desk agent, a restaurant server, a teacher, and a baseball bat maker, who was a former MLB pitcher.

 

Want a bit more about how to teach kids workforce appreciation?

Check out:

teach kids workforce appreciation  teachmama.com

 

kronos: workforce appreciationfyi: This post was written as part of a partnership with Find Your Influence, and as always, ideas and opinions are all my own, influenced only by my experience as a parent and educator. Find out more at 1 in one hundred million. Subscribe so you don’t miss any of their videos and follow #WorkforceStories and #1in100MM!

 

parent teacher connect: parents and teachers working TOGETHER is the key to children’s success in school

parent teacher connect  teachmama.com

parent teacher connect  teachmama.com

 

We’ve got something cool brewing, my friends, and we want you to come along for the ride!

Join us over at teachmama.com: parent teacher connect— a platform where parents and teachers can ask questions, get answers, support each other, and learn how to best reach all of our children.  

Parents and teachers working TOGETHER is the key to children’s success in school. Parent Teacher Connect is a spot for parents and teachers to CONNECT. 

Everyone is welcome here–parents, teachers, administrators, classroom volunteers, you name it.

Here we can have a working, continual dialogue between parents AND teachers. I am SO excited to bring to life a platform where parents and teachers can ask questions, get answers, support each other, and learn how to best reach all of our children.

Teachers:

  • What do you wish parents knew about their children’s success in school?
  • What resources do you have that really help to reach students?
  • How best do you communicate with parents?
  • What works in your classroom?
    teachmama parent teacher connect header 3

 

Parents:

  • What do you wish teachers knew about how your child can meet with success in school?
  • What resources do you have that really help support your child?
  • How best do you communicate with teachers?
  • How do you manage homework?

We’re here for ANY and ALL questions you have, but our goal is to cover the following topics each day:

Math Monday: math will be our focus here

Techy Tuesday: tips, tricks, ideas for integrating technology at home and in the classroom

Wildcard Wednesday: anything goes!

Read to Me Thursday: books, books, books!

Foundation Friday: help for building foundations for learning at home and in the classroom

STEM Saturday: science, technology, engineering, and math

Social Sunday: share links, resources, posts, anything that you want others to read or see

Join us: teachmama.com: parent teacher connect.

Tell me, friends–what topics do you want to see covered? How can we make this group work for you?

We really want to know!

bleached out disney t-shirts for the not-so-crafty crafter

bleached out disney tshirts teachmama.com

post contains affiliate links

 

 

bleached out disney tshirts  teachmama.com black shirt

We’re all busy.

And most of us really like to get a bit crafty but don’t have the time.

This little crafty craft is for you. And it’s for me.

Because it is so easy.

It’s so quick.

And the results are really, truly awesome.

We wanted to do something to let our kids know that we’re heading to Disney World in the next few days, but I didn’t want to do a full-fledged scavenger hunt like we did before.

We didn’t want to do a Disney countdown.

We wanted to pull the ‘YAY WE’RE GOING TO DISNEY WORLD TODAY!!!!’ surprise.

Kind of. We had to keep in mind that our kids do much, much better with a little bit of prep time. Even a teensy bit of prep time helps.

Here’s the skinny. . .

Bleached Out Disney T-Shirts for the Not-So Crafty Crafter

Making these was super easy.

Because my husband and I are surprising Maddy, Owen, and Cora with the trip, I needed to be able to make these t-shirts quickly and in the time that they were in school. So start to finish had to be within six hours. These took a fraction of that time.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

What you need:

What you need to do:

1. Print out the template you want to use.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

 

We used super-simple Mickey ears ones: you can download them here–mouse templates | teachmama.com

Please, if you choose to share this post–and we hope you do!–consider linking to this post instead of the attachment page. Thank you!)

 

2. Trace the template onto freezer paper.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

You can do this easily by placing the freezer paper on top of the printout and tracing it with a pencil.

 

3. Cut out the image from freezer paper.

I think if you have a detailed design, you could use a razor, but my design was easy, so I did it with scissors.

 

4. Iron the freezer paper stencil to the t-shirt.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

Not kidding. I didn’t know this would work, either, but one side of the freezer paper gets just a wee bit sticky when heated. Find the shiny side of the freezer paper and make sure that side touches the t-shirt.  Find the place you want the image, and place it there.

Remember that the freezer paper blocks the bleach, so wherever that stencil is will be untouched.

6. Mix your bleach solution.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

Because my t-shirts were dark colored, I knew that we wouldn’t need a lot of bleach to pull out color, so we went with a 60: 40 mix of bleach and water. I filled about 60% of the spray bottle with bleach and then added water to the remaining 40%.

If you’re doing a light grey shirt or light yellow or pink shirt, maybe you want to use all bleach, but since ours were black, bright blue, and dark grey, I was pretty confident that even if our bleach was diluted a bit, it would yield the results I wanted.

7. Place cardboard inside the shirt. 

Make sure that the cardboard covers all edges unless you want the bleach to carry over to the side a bit. We want to make sure that only the front of the shirt is bleached and that it doesn’t seep through to the back of the shirt.

 

8. Spray, baby, spray.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

Make sure that the spray nozzle is on the mist setting — test it in the sink if you need to. Then give the spray bottle a shake, and spray the shirt.

Keep the bottle about 6-12  inches from the shirt, depending on the look you want to achieve.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

You can either make sure the area around the stencil is saturated, or just spray lightly.  You can use a hairdryer to speed up the drying and bleaching process, or you can let the bleach air dry.  Again, it depends on what you want your shirt to look like.

9.  Carefully remove the stencil.  

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

After the bleach settles a bit and before the freezer paper stencil gets super soggy, take the stencil off of the t-shirt

All three of mine removed super easy, with just a gentle pull of a corner.  If you need a start to lift up the stencil, use the edge of a dull knife or scissors. The last thing you want to have happen is to make a hole because you tried lifting the stencil too quickly with a sharp knife.

10.  Let your shirt dry just a bit and then rinse and wash the shirt. 

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

 

First rinse the shirt in cold water to remove all of the bleach (See those little white dots in the top photo? That’s the bleach–it must be rinsed away. . . ).

And the finished shirt? Check it out:

bleached out disney tshirts teachmama.com

Then wring it out and wash it (or them, if you did several) in a gentle cycle wash. I dried my shirts on low, and they were fine. I needed them finished by the end of the school day, remember!

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

Some tips: 

  • Make sure you are in a well-ventilated area.  I mean it. Bleach can really smell strong.
  • Put your shirt on a hanger to let your shirt dry for a bit before you rinse out the bleach.
  • Experiment a little–use a Q-tip to try some bleachy dots on the shirt, use a paint brush, or use the freezer paper in fun, new ways.

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

Have. Fun.

Really, this trip is going to be fun, so make sure that your crafty craftiness before the trip is fun, too.

Check out a quickie video with the how-to: 

Do you subscribe to teachmama.com on YouTube? You should!! 
And really–let me know–have you tried this? What works and what doesn’t?

Looking for more Disney craft ideas?

bleached out disney t-shirts | teachmama.com

You will not believe what some of my crafty friends are doing. They totally rock.

And they, too, will be at Disney Social Media Moms Celebration next week. So do follow along with the fun at #DisneySMMC or on Instagram.

disney crafts round up numbered

Definitely check out what they’ve done:

  1. Little Mermaid Ears, by Vanessa of See Vanessa Craft
  2. DIY Disney Jewelry with Free Printable, by Jen of 100 Directions
  3. DIY BB-8 Shirt, by Karen of Desert Chica
  4. DIY Disney Autograph and Activity Book, by Sara of Clever Pink Pirate
  5. Disney Trip Countdown – DIY Washi Tape Chalkboard, by Sara of Mom Endeavors
  6. Disney Drawstring Backpack, by Laura of Pink Cake Plate
  7. bleached out disney t-shirts for the not-so-crafty crafter, by Amy of teach mama
  8. Disney Sticker Story Starters, by Marie of Make and Takes
  9. Disney Princess Duct Tape Hand Mirror, by Heather of Dollar Store Crafts
  10. Custom Toy Story Shorts and Shirts, by Kelly of Eclectic Momsense

 

 

Here are a few other ways to countdown or celebrate your own Disney vacation: 

haircare stress and kids: eliminate the stress with these three tips

stress free haircare for kids | teachmama.com

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stress free haircare for kids | teachmama.com

I have always been a fan of short hair on little girls.

Always.

I just think it’s super cute and easy and fun. I kept Maddy and Cora’s hair short with little bangs for years and years, which is why now, they insist on having long, long, forever long hair.

They always want long hair. Always want to wear it down. Always takes 20 extra minutes in the morning to get the perfect pony or perfect braid, and it causes a boatload of stress.

Thankfully we’ve got a few ways that can help eliminate–or control–haircare stress.

Three tips that I really, truly think will help your familia.

Here’s the skinny. . .

Haircare Stress and Kids– Eliminate Stress with These 3 Tips:

Now, be aware that eliminating is a strong word and that it may take a little bit of time, effort, and energy on everyone’s part before the stress of haircare is totally eliminated. But know that with a few little ‘tweaks’, haircare stress can at least be controlled.

1.  The Fancy Brush.  

haircare stress and kids: teachmama.com

haircare stress and kids |teachmama.com

You can read all about the Fancy Brush here.

Though we’ve graduated from the Fancy Brush to the Wet Brush, both girls have one of their own, and they both do take good care of them.

 

2.  The Products.

haircare stress and kids | teachmama.com socozy

We have only been introduced to this line of products recently, but we have fallen hard for them: SoCozy haircare for kids.

The SoCozy line is a line of haircare products for kids created by Cozy Friedman, the owner of Cozy’s Cuts for Kids, which is a premier children’s hair salon in New York.  Fancy, right? The thing is, they’re actually solid products that really work.

According to Cora, the combination of Cinch and Behave makes the perfect pony. She’s been using the combo herself for the last few days.

haircare stress and kids | teachmama.com socozy

haircare stress and kids | teachmama.com socozy

Haircare products not your thing? It’s cool. I get it.

Then at least check out SoCozy Boo! Boo! is lice prevention shampoo, and the description is a riot: scares away lice. . . naturally. I’ll take it. Sign me up.

Can there be a rule that every kid in school must use SoCozy Boo!?  Please?

Take a quick look at a professional stylist telling me how she made Cora’s perfect ballerina bun:

We had the chance to hang out with the Cozy Friedman at a local event last week at Make Meaning in Bethesda.

It was a ton of fun.

stress free haircare for kids | teach mama

stress free haircare for kids | teach mama

stress free haircare for kids | teach mama

stress free haircare for kids | teach mama

stress free haircare for kids | teach mama

Check out all of the photos from our event:

Cozy Friedman first opened Cozy’s Cuts For Kids, a premiere children’s hair salon aimed at redefining the entire children’s haircut experience, in 1992.

Now, 20 years and multiple salons later, Friedman introduces SoCozy salon formulas for kids – the first ever premium line of hair care products made with the finest ingredients gentle enough for kids. Offering non-toxic products with no parabens, sulfates, phthalates, synthetic color, propylene glycol and free of gluten, wheat and nuts that perform at a salon level with packaging that appeals to kids and parents alike.

SoCozy celebrates all hair types and solves a range of common hair care problems faced by children. For more info visit www.SoCozy.com.

 

3. The Nighttime Ponytail.

haircare stress and kids | teachmama.com pony

 

Really, this is the most simple tip ever: have your kids sleep in ponytails at night.

It’s amazing how much it helps eliminate hair chaos in the mornings. Fewer tangles.  Hair manageable.  Happier kids.  Happier parents.

And? If the girls want to get a little crazy, make it a braid at night with damp hair. The waves will make just about any Disney Channel star green with envy.

 

How do you manage haircare stress for your kids? What works, and what doesn’t? I’d love to know!

Do you want to see if SoCozy and the crew are making your way to an event in your town?

Check out the SoCozy blog | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Instagram  | Pinterest

 

fyi: This is a sponsored post, written as a partnership with SoCozy and Target. As always, my opinions are all my own, influenced only by my experience as a parent and educator and a mom whose had her fair share of haircare stress–with kids who are only 11, 9, 8 years old. 

teach kids workforce appreciation: celebrating those who make our day brighter

teach kids workforce appreciation | teachmama.com

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teach kids workforce appreciation | teachmama.com

We have always taught our kids to be thankful for each and every person who makes our day a little brighter.

And those people include family and friends, neighbors and teachers, but it also includes our newspaper deliverer, and the grocery cashier. Our dry cleaner and mail carrier and the folks who take away our recyclables and trash.

We could be pretty cranky if we had to cut the grass at our favorite playground, so we are thankful for the people who manage the grounds.

We’d be miserable if we had to cut Brady’s fur, but thanks to our groomer, we don’t have to.

When our garage door breaks? Thankfully, we have someone to call. If we need help adding a new light fixture?  The electrician can come lend a hand.

All of these people help to make our day brighter.

All of these people are part of our workforce and deserve to be celebrated.

And it’s really something that needs to be explicitly taught–or modeled–to our children.  Three easy ways, friends.

Here’s the skinny. . .

Teach Kids Workforce Appreciation–Celebrating Those Who Make Our Day Brighter: 

Here are three easy ways that parents can help instill an appreciation for all those in the workforce:

1. Model gratitude and thanks for those in the workforce.

teach kids workforce appreciation  teachmama.com 1

This is super simple: say ‘please’ and ‘thank you’ to those people who help you at checkout lines, who support you on the phone, who greet you as you walk into stores, and who perform service-related tasks.

So often I see people forgetting this simple act of kindness, acting as if the work that these folks do is not as important as it is.

Hopefully, we can change that by modeling gratitude.

 

2.  Teach children about all jobs so that they know how hard others work.

teach kids workforce appreciation  teachmama.com 1

When we know better, we do better, right? Take time to really teach kids about all different types of jobs so that they learn how valued each and every job really is.

This, too, is easier than you think.

Check out the “1 in one hundred million” site–it’s a site devoted to sharing the personal stories of people who do the many important and too-often unrecognized jobs upon which we all rely.  Here, ordinary people in the workforce share their story.

I love it.

Created by Kronos, each month “1 in one hundred million” site releases a new video profiling a person’s story. They’ve covered a firefighter, a trauma nurse, a produce manager at grocery store, a union electrician, a hotel front desk agent, a restaurant server, a teacher, and a baseball bat maker, who was a former MLB pitcher.

celebrating all jobs in the workforce  teachmama.com 3

celebrating all jobs in the workforce  teachmama.com 3

I love that this series profiles just one of the one hundred million, often under-appreciated, people in the workforce. Hopefully this series will help everyone to better appreciate those people who often make our day brighter.

Find out more about this cool campaign here: 1in100million.com  |  #1in100MM |  #WorkforceStories

3.  Take some local, behind-the-scenes field trips.

teach kids workforce appreciation  teachmama.com 1

I know this option isn’t always an option depending on where you live, but this is one of my kids’ fondest memories of growing up: take local field trips.

For years I wrote about how we took ‘behind the scenes’ tours of our local pizza place, fire station, flower shop, and recycling center. We visited so many places with our moms’ group that I truly believe it helped show my kids how important our community members really were.

Often, all you need to do is give the business a quick call beforehand, and the people there are more than excited to show a family around. Try it.

 

How do you help to show your kids that everyone in the workforce deserves to be appreciated? I’d love to hear it!

 

 

 

2547-201503241952345821fyi: This post was written as part of a partnership with Find Your Influence, and as always, ideas and opinions are all my own, influenced only by my experience as a parent and educator. Find out more at 1 in one hundred million. Subscribe so you don’t miss any of their videos!

 

how to have a family meeting: what works for us

how to have a family meeting: what works for us

how to have a family meeting: what works for us

 

Oh, friends.

How things change as our kids get older, right?

After years of doing what we can to give our kids choices, listening to them, doing all we can but ultimately having the final say–our kids have expressed to us that they want more of a voice in our family.

I get it.

So we’ve been having Family Meetings.

We have only recently begun to have regular Family Meetings, and though they are not perfect, I do think they help.’

We’re still learning. Aren’t we all?

Here’s the skinny. . .

How to Have a Family Meeting–What Works for Us: 

It’s been simple.

I created a pretty basic Family Meeting Sheet.

And any time anyone wants to call a Family Meeting, he or she may do so.

The first time we held one, I clipped the Family Meeting sheet onto a clip board, and I set it on the table.

And as the kids came and went through the day, they filled it out.

By the time the meeting rolled around, everyone was ready–and curious.

how to have a family meeting: what works for us

how to have a family meeting: what works for us

We said,

Okay, guys. So you’ve asked for more say in our family, so here we are. We’re here to work out the kinks and hopefully make things move more smoothly around here.

There are a few ground rules: 

  • Everyone listens.
  • Everyone speaks.
  • Everyone acts respectfully, no matter what.

In Lord of the Flies style, anyone who spoke held an object–I think ours was a stuffed Mario or Yoshi. That way, there was no interrupting and only listening.

And really? From that point on, we talked through the agenda–what my husband and I planned and what the kids added–and we worked out the kinks.

 

family meeting notice blank

family meeting notice blank | teachmama.com

Here’s a BLANK Family Meeting sheet if you’d like to download it as a pdf and use it as your own: family meeting notice blank | teachmama.com

(Please, if you choose to share it–and we hope you do!–please share this post instead of the attachment page. Thank you!)

 

family meeting notice 2

family meeting notice OURS | teachmama.com

Here’s our Family Meeting sheet if you’d like to download it as a pdf and use it as your own: family meeting notice OURS | teachmama.com

(Please, if you choose to share it–and we hope you do!–please share this post instead of the attachment page. Thank you!)

how to have a family meeting  teachmama.com

 

What does your family do? Do you hold regular Family Meetings? I’d love to hear it!

What has worked? What hasn’t?

don’t send your child to Kindergarten until you take this Home Study!

get kids ready for kindergarten

Friends!

I have been so, so busy lately, working hard on our teachmama.com redesign– woo-hooooo! and working on some other really fun and exciting things for you.

 

what every parent must know before sending kids to kindergarten  stop sign teachmama.com

This week, I launched the first of a series of teach mama Home Studies: short, information-packed, interactive courses designed to change your life.

Perhaps you think ‘changing your life’ is a little lofty–but it’s true.  It really can change your life–and your child’s. 

Here’s the thing: in the last 10 years, I have spoken at dozens of local and national events, sharing information about teaching, learning, and community building.  One workshop I’ve done dozens of times is about how parents can prepare their children for Kindergarten. 

Time and time again, the feedback is the same.

Check it out to learn more, but know that spots are filling quickly: teach mama Home Study Kindergarten prep.

live focused: finding clarity in thoughts and actions

live focused: finding clarity in thoughts and actions | teachmama.com

live focused: finding clarity in thoughts and actions | teachmama.com

 

Oh friends. .  .February and March are always so glum for me.

What about you? Do you find that you fall into the winter doldrums this time of the year? If so, let’s power through it together.

Together.

This year, we’ve already done a whole lot of organizing.  YAY!

We’ve rekindled friendships and make relationships a priority. Woo-hooo!

Now is a great time to do some serious thinking and reflecting.

We’re going to figure some stuff out.

Here’s the skinny. . .

Live Focused–Finding Clarity in Thoughts and Actions: 

So often, our thoughts and actions are not aligned–we think one thing but say another.

live focused: finding clarity in thoughts and actions

We say one thing but do another.

And I truly believe that this is not always intentional. Rather, we’re so busy that we don’t give ourselves enough time to really think things through.

This month, let’s figure it out.

Let’s think about how we really feel and move forward from there, okay?

First, download the March #livefocused printable.

 

find clarity in thoughts and actions | teachmama.com #livefocused

 

You can find it here: live focused printable march – teachmama.com

(Please, if you choose to share it–and we hope you do!–please link to this post instead of the attachment page. Thank you!)

Then find a quiet place to think. 

Pour yourself a cup of coffee or a glass of wine.  And fill out the sheet.

Essentially, think about: 

What part of your household systems are working?

What needs to change?

How can you improve? 

clarity  livefocused  teachmama.comConsider the following areas: 

  • behavior — the kids’ behavior; your behavior; your spouse’s behavior; what is tolerated and not tolerated; behavior management systems
  • screen time — how much each day; monitoring; safety; sharing; care of devices
  • chores — what chores are done and by whom; rotation of chores; jobs around the house; family responsibilities
  • homework — where homework is completed; who helps with homework; rules and expectations about homework
  • activities — children activities; family activities; costs of activities; practices; child and adult responsibilities
  • communication — communication among family members, friends, and school; what is acceptable and not
  • other — think: religion, relationships; finances; health; jobs; etc.

Fill out the sheet.  And then get ready to make some changes.

This month I’ll share the resources I know of that may help in these areas; if you have others that work, I’d love for you to share them with us!

 

live focused in 2015 friendship teachmama.com sq

Are you in? Let me know, friends. I need to know I’m not walking alone on this journey!

  • share any of the photos here on your facebook page
  • share any of the photos here on your twitter or instagram page
  • share any of the photos here on your google + page or blog!

Tweet this:

  • tweet this: I am ready for some CLARITY this month! Join @teachmama and me: #livefocused bit.ly/TMclarity
  • tweet this: I am psyched to join @teachmama in her #livefocused 2015 adventure! Join me: http://ctt.ec/warK2+
  • tweet this: Do YOU want to live a more focused, intentional life this year? Join the #livefocused crew: http://ctt.ec/ad7NC+ @teachmama
  • tweet this: Make this year COUNT. Get focused. Live intentionally. http://ctt.ec/aq9Vy+ #livefocused @teachmama

Check it all out video-style:

 And? If you don’t already subscribe to teachmama.com’s YouTube channel, you totally want to!

live focused 2015 teachmama.com b w collage

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click below for #livefocused archives:

ive focused in 2015 organization teachmama.com sq

live focused in 2015 friendship teachmama.com sq

read across america day EVERY day of the year

celebrate read across america every day | teachmama.com

This post was originally published on March 1, 2013 but we’re republishing because it’s that important. 

 

celebrate read across america every day | teachmama.com

 

It’s Read Across America Day!  Only something that everyone’s been talking about for days and days and days and days now, but don’t worry if you’re already in your pj’s or missed the boat altogether.

Don’t worry if this is the very first time you’re hearing about it and now you feel like  you’re the only kid not invited to the party. TO-tally not so!  Everyone’s invited to this bash–no matter who you are, where you are, or what you read.

Read Across America Day is a simply the day that marks the birthday of Dr. Seuss.  Read Across America Day has kids all over the country reading Seuss, rhyming, watching Cat in the Hat and The Lorax videos, and wearing a whole lot of red and white stripes to school.  And Read Across America Day kicks off THE reading month: March.read across america day every day

But I really think that Read Across America Day–and the whole hoopla of reading-excitement that follows through most of March–should be carried on every day.

In my opinion, reading can–and should–have a place in everyone’s house on every day of the year. That’s right. Every. Single. Day.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Read Across America Day EVERY Day of the Year: You got it.

Check it out–

 

In this quickie video I’m sharing 3 ways that families everywhere can bring home the Read Across America excitement any day they choose.

I touch on three easy things any parent can do to make their home a literate environment, to raise word-conscious kids, and to make books a constant conversation.

 

What am I missing? What else could–and should–parents do to bring Read Across America home all year long?  Let me know in the comments section, please!

 

fyi: want to check out the books I mention in the vlog?

Some affiliate links are used. Many thanks for considering!