the ultimate healthy living bundle: teachmama fab find

the ultimate healthy living bundle: teachmama fab find

post contains affiliate links

 

 

 

ultimate healthy bundle | teachmama fab find

It’s the beginning of a new school year, and for me, that always means it’s a time to restart, recharge, and re-examine our family’s health and routines. 

After a summer full of ice-cream cones, freeze pops, and backyard bbq’s (and okay, a few too many Summer Shandys), I really needed to make some changes. All of my clothes were feeling tighter, and honestly, my body hadn’t had the time–or energy–to really move much this summer with three kids home all of the time.

I’m not complaining; I wouldn’t change a thing.  I’m just stating the truth. I needed a redo. A jump-start. A kick in the behind.

You know me–I’m a big sweet-toothed gal by nature, and so are my kids. So cutting sugar, eating healthier, and being conscious of our all-around well-being is a top priority right now.

I’ve found a great bunch of resources that I think every busy mom will appreciate and could really use during this season of new beginnings: The Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle.

It’s big. And it’s awesome.

But don’t be intimidated. Grab the deal. Download the books. And read them as you’re ready.

Simply click below to grab this deal:

 

 

For the ridiculously low price of just $29.97 (for the PDF version) or $39.97 (for the eReader version), you can get access to a carefully curated collection of eBooks and eCourses with a total combined value of $1,030.

The bundle contains a wealth of information from the very finest healthy living writers out there – but there’s no risk of getting overwhelmed! A useful Getting Started Guide is included with your purchase, which will help you identify the most valuable resources for your specific health priorities.

The Ultimate Bundles team has done all the hard work for you – finding the top experts across a number of healthy living fields and combining their products into one essential collection. If you want to take control of your health, there’s no better way to start!

 

The Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle will only be on sale for 6 days – from 8am EST on Wednesday, September 10 until 11:59pm EST on Monday, September 15.

But don’t wait until the last moment – there are only 30,000 bundles available and once they’re gone, they’re gone!

You can buy with confidence because your purchase is covered by the Ultimate Bundles one-year guarantee: you have a full year to enjoy all the books and courses in the bundle, and if you don’t feel like it’s made a huge difference to your family’s health, you’ll get your money back in full!


As if this great collection of eBooks and eCourses wasn’t enough, the Ultimate Bundles team has also partnered with 10 fantastic companies who’ve each agreed to give a special bonus to every buyer. The bonuses have a total value of over $200 – more than 5 times the price of the Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle itself!

The bonuses include free goodies aplenty: a bottle of Healthy Mouth Blend from OraWellness, a baltic amber bracelet from Sweetbottoms Boutique, and a starter culture from Cultures For Health. You’ll also get gift sets from Made On Skin Care Products and Homegrown Collective.

There are virtual goodies, too – a 4-month membership to StayAtHomeYoga.com and a 3-month premium membership to meal planning service Tradishen. And as if all that weren’t enough, there are also $15 gift certificates for TheJoyfulGiraffe.com, Strawesome.com and Trilight Health. There is a nominal shipping charge for many of the bonuses, based on each company’s standard shipping rates, and is usually $3-5.

 

Here’s what you need to know about the sale:

When? 7 a.m. EST Wednesday, September 10 until 11:59 p.m. EST Monday, September 15

What? 73 eBooks and 7 audio & eCourses, PLUS over $200 worth of bonus products you’ll really use!

Where? Purchase the bundle HERE.

How much? Well now, that’s the best part. The entire package is worth $1030, and it’s selling for less than $30. Sweet deal, right?

Want to know exactly what’s included in the bundle?

Take a look through the categories, as well as the full list of eBooks and eCourses.

We think there’s something here for everyone, and don’t forget… our Getting Started Guide will show you exactly which resources cover the topics and health concerns that matter most to you!

Alternative Health & Home Remedies

Audio Courses & eCourses

Fitness

Gardening & Homesteading

Green Cleaning

 

Healthy Children

Meal Budgeting & Planning

Natural Beauty & Skincare

 

Real Food Recipes

Seasonal

Special Diets

 

Remember, this bundle is available for 6 days only, from 7 a.m. (EST) on Wednesday, September 10th to 11:59 p.m. (EST) on Monday, September 15th.

Disclosure: I have included affiliate links in this post. Read the fine print about this bundle and read the answers to frequently asked questions about the bundle.

 

 

 

fyi: I am an affilliate partner of The Ultimate Healthy Living Bundle.

 

 

 

 

noticing your kids: little observations mean a lot from parents

noticing your kids: little observations mean a lot from parents

originally published 9/17/09 but republishing now because it’s worth it–

 

Lately, I’ve felt overwhelmed by Cora’s ‘two-year-old-ness’. noticing your kids  observations mean a lot from parents  teachmama.com

Her fiery temper; her constant movement; her unceasing energy; her smiles, hugs, songs, and cuddles; her high high’s, and her low low’s. Some days we enjoy this roller coaster ride, and others, we all want off.

But what I’ve also realized is that as a parent, I’m more experienced than I was when Maddy was two, but I’m not in the fog of fatigue that I muddled through when Owen was the same age. I’m in a different place, and although I sometimes wish that Cora already knew the correct ways of behaving, I seem to have forgotten that those behaviors have to be taught.

So last week, I needed to revisit my old, trusty parenting books for a quick refresher. I didn’t like that I had begun to sound like a broken record, ordering everyone around, raising my voice, and being a reactive parent instead of a proactive parent.

I needed to stop, breathe, and really start to notice the behaviors I wanted her to continue. And then I needed to share with her what I noticed.

It’s all about “shining your light” where you indicate value:

  • Noticing Behaviors: The goal with noticing is to state an observation rather than make a judgement.

NoGood job, Cora.

Yes!Cora, you put your toys in the bin and your clothes in the drawers. You cleaned your room so you can find things when you want them.

Wordy, yes. Takes thought, yes. But it does make sense, especially for our little guys.

Here’s the skinny

  • Start your sentence with the child’s name or the pronoun ‘you’. Look at you!, or I noticed. . .
  • Describe what you see. You found her blanket and gave it to her. That was helpful!
  • End your description with a ‘tag’. Tags describe attributes of your child or values you admire, like that took determination; you sure are organized; that was helpful; that was thoughtful.

Some examples

  • Look at you! You’re eating with your spoon!
  • You did it! You went potty on the big potty. Good for you!
  • Owen, you held the door for Cora. That was helpful.
  • Cora, you offered Maddy a french fry when hers were all gone. That was so thoughtful.
  • Maddy, you picked up all of the doll clothes without being asked. That was super helpful.

Becky Bailey believes that if you accentuate your child’s strengths, you teach them their abilities. If you encourage their contribution, you teach them how important it is that they share their gifts.

It’s hard. It’s so hard. But positive behaviors have to be taught–which is much easier said than done sometimes.

And if we spotlight the behaviors that we want repeated (think: Special Plate), then most likely those behaviors will be repeated.

This Quick Trick is another one from Becky Bailey’s Easy to Love, Difficult to Discipline (2000), which has helped me to become more conscious in my disciplining. (When I am disciplined enough to use it!)

I’m far from an expert, hardly the perfect parent, and by nature am quick-tempered and fiery myself (hmmmm, where does sweet Cora get it?), but I am always, always looking for quick tricks to keep in my back pocket. Do share yours!

 

 


 

fyi: affiliate links used in this post

how to talk to your kids about instagram

how to talk to your kids about instagram | teachmama.com #digitalliteracy #digitalkids

It’s hard.how to talk to your kids about instagram | teachmama.com

For many of us with tweens, times are a tough.

Or if they’re not tough now, they’re going to be.

It’s the group mentality: they want to do what their friends are doing.

And it was easy when it was as simple as getting them Rainbow Loom bands for their bracelet-making or letting them poke around the cell phone and text family members.

But now, our kids want to jump on the Instagram bandwagon. They want to do what so many of their friends are doing, and if you’re anything like me, you’re confused.

  • Is Instagram really a big deal?
  • Should we just cave and let them on Instagram?
  • What does Instagram even do?
  • What should I know about kids and Instagram?
  • How should I support my child if he/she is already using Instagram?

And though I don’t have all of the answers, I have talked to friends and experts and done a considerable amount of research for the last few months.

After all, I’m hanging out on social media platforms a whole lot of the time.

And so finally, I think I have some ideas about how you can talk to your kids about Instagram.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • How to Talk to Your Kids About Instagram:

how to talk to kids about instagram 10 teachmama.com

First of all, here’s what you should know about Instagram, whether you’re on it or not:

Straight from the Instagram site:

Instagram is a fun and quirky way to share your life with friends through a series of pictures. Snap a photo with your mobile phone, then choose a filter to transform the image into a memory to keep around forever

What does it mean for not-so-techy parents:

Instagram is a way that people can share photos or short videos with anyone, at any time. They can make the photo fancy with a filter and a frame and share from their phone, iPad, or tablet; people can like the photo and comment on it, and unless they delete the photo themselves, it will live forever on the internet.

 

how to talk to kids about instagram 10 teachmama.com

 

how to talk to kids about instagram 10 teachmama.com

 

Here’s a quick how-to, an Instagram 101 in like five seconds:

1. download the app from the Google Play Store or iTunes (it’s free)

2. create an account

3. take a photo or video (either use the camera on your phone and then share it via Instagram or open the camera right on the Instagram app)

4. choose a filter (or not)

5. write a little something describing the photo or maybe tag someone in the photo

6. use a hashtag if you want other people to find your photo

7. share the photo!

how to talk to kids about instagram | teachmama.com

 

how to talk to kids about instagram | teachmama.com
Now, here are my answers to the questions I asked above: 

  • Is it a big deal? 
    • Yes. It’s a big deal because for many kids, this is the first time they’re ever putting content out into the world for the whole world to see.
  • Should we just cave and let them on Instagram?
    • Instagram Terms of Service says, like most social networks: You must be at least 13 years old to use the Service.
    • Though I admit that this summer I really came close to caving and letting my 10-year-old have an account, I have a husband who put his foot down with a firm NO! and some of my uber tech-savvy friends sang the same song.
    • But you read through this post and decide for yourself. Most certainly every child and every family is different.
  • What does Instagram even do?
    • Instagram lets users share photos and short videos with the world.  If a profile is public, anyone can see any of the photos or videos. And often kids take a lot of selfies and selfie videos.
  • What should I know?
    • You need to know that even if your child’s account is ‘private’ strangers are able to request to follow him or her. 
    • You need to know that your child can search anything on Instagram, and even harmless searches can turn up some pretty tricky photos.  Check out the examples below.

how to talk to kids about instagram | teachmama.com

how to talk to kids about instagram | teachmama.com

  • You need to know that often young users get crafty and clever with accounts.  Often kids change names and create ‘dummy’ profiles like [bob]is.my.bff or I_love_big_feet or cool.kids.of.blakems or you get the idea.  How will your child feel if he or she is not one of the bffs or cool kids or pretty girls or hot guys?  How will you feel if you find out your child has created one of these exclusive accounts?
  • You need to know that if your child’s profile is public, anyone can comment on it–and you have no control over comment moderation. That means that if some crazy person writes something crazy on your kid’s photo, it’s stuck there until the kid deletes the photo.  If your underage child reports another user for inappropriate content, then what?

 

how to talk to kids about instagram 6  teachmama.com

 

how to talk to kids about instagram 5  teachmama.com

  • You need to know that your child can monitor other users’ behavior.  And if your child’s profile is public, other people can monitor his or her behavior.  Again, with young users who are already vying for each other’s attention, this is something to think about.  All you need is one kid to follow a suspect account or start interacting with said suspect account for others to soon follow suit.

 

how to talk to kids about instagram 6  teachmama.com

  • You need to know that your child can add a photo map to his or her account. Honestly, maps or gps locators are never a good idea when it comes to social media, no matter who you are. Who really wants the world to know where he or she is 100% of the time?

 

how to talk to kids about instagram 6  teachmama.com

 

  •  How should I support my child if he/she is already using Instagram?
    • Monitor, monitor, monitor.
    • Talk, talk, talk.
    • Insist your child has a private profile.
    • Follow your child’s account and follow his or her friends’ accounts.
    • Follow your child’s friends’ parents’ accounts.
    • Approve your child’s followers.
    • Require all electronic devices to be ‘parked’ in a designated charging spot by a certain time each night.
    • Create a Family Media Agreement–decide upon some rules and regulations that best suit your child and your family and stick to them!

create a family media agreement | teachmama.com

 

 

This is by no means an exhaustive list of how-to’s. It’s just the beginning. And it will hopefully open up a dialogue between you and your children about Instagram and other social media sharing platforms.

And rather than screaming NO WAY and slamming the door on your child’s request to use Instagram (or any platform that you are not comfortable permitting), consider giving your child an alternative.

Say, I’m not comfortable with you using Instagram right now because you’re ten years old and Instagram Terms of Service require you to be 13 in order to use it. They set those rules for a reason, and we will follow them. Instead why don’t you try:

What works for you? 

Is your child on Instagram or another social media platform? 

How do you keep your child safe online, or what guidelines has your family found most effective? We’d love to hear it!

digital kids | teachmama.com

Want some more on digital literacy?  Check out our digital kids posts for more.

 

Or check out these other posts about kids & Instagram: 

how to get kids to talk about school: what every parent must know

how to get kids to talk about school: what every parent must know | teachmama.com

As a paid Quaker Classroom AmbassadorI am eager to share information about Quaker Up For Classrooms.   how to get kids to talk about school: what every parent must know School is underway for us, and what I’m realizing more and more is that it’s sometimes tough to get my kids to talk about school. As a parent, I’m curious. I want to know everything:

  • Who did they sat with at lunch?
  • Who did they play with at recess?
  • How do they like their tablemates?
  • What book did they start in Guided Reading?
  • Who hosted the morning tv show?

But it’s hard. The kids are tired at 3pm, they’re even more tired at 7pm, and the last thing they want to do is talk to boring old Mom about school. So I have to get creative–and I know I’m not the only one. Hopefully these tricks for getting kids to talk about school will help you get a little more info from your little loves about what goes on in their lives, 6 hours a day, 5 days a week. Here’s the skinny. . .

  • How to Get Kids to Talk About School:

The most important thing here is that we really have to read our own kids, not be too pushy, and try to let the conversations evolve naturally.  And we need to listen. Seriously. I know–not always easy. So I’ve found that with my three kids, I’ve tried three different approaches: 1. direct questions; 2. group questions; 3. distracted questions. how to get kids to talk about school direct questions  teachmama.com 1.  direct questions: Most often, numero uno–direct questions–are a complete and utter fail for me. Save for those rare occasions when the stars are aligned, the odds are rarely ever in my favor for this technique. I ask questions, and I get quick, abbreviated responses that hardly make sense.  Even with open-ended questions the kids don’t want to chat this way with me.

me: How was recess? (This must be a subject they’ll want to talk about! )

kid: Fine.

me: Whadja play?

kid: Lotsa stuff.

me: What was your favorite game?

kid: Everything.

me: Who’d ya play with most?

kid: Everyone.

me: Awesome.

Never fear. Numero dos and tres have yielded better results for me. how to get kids to talk about school group questions  teachmama.com 2. group questions: Group questions often work for us. They often work especially around the dinner table and when we’ve got an audience, even if that audience is Dad. Because really? Dad’s mucho awesome. He’s not hangin’ around the house as much as me, so he’s almost extra-special something. And if we mix things up a bit, they almost always work.

  • Speed answer: Go around the dinner table and everyone gives a quick, one or two word answer to the same question.
  • Ball toss: Everyone answers the same question, though not at the same time.  The speaker holds a ball. He or she tosses the ball to the next person, and that person answers. This one is great for after school, after snack, out in the back yard.
  • Hula hello: Give kids a hula hoop and they answer as many questions as they can while hula-hooping.
  • Question train: You start with one question and choose a person to answer. That person answers and asks another question to the next person. And so on and so on.

how to get kids to talk about school distracted questions  teachmama.com 3.  distracted questions: One of my dear friends suggested that chatting with tweens and teens is best conducted this way–while you’re both doing something.

  • Snack chat:  While everyone’s eating a snack and before homework starts, chat school.
  • Kitchen helpers: Having one kid help prepare dinner has been hugely helpful in opening the door to conversation about school. While kids are cutting veggies, mixing mac and cheese, or emptying the dishwasher, they often want to talk to pass the time.
  • Travel convo: When kids are held captive in the car and as you’re schlepping everyone from soccer and piano lessons and then back again, ask questions. Though often for me, my kids really want to zone out in the car, sometimes, they’re pretty chatty. Again, depends on the day.
  • Chore chats:  Many times I remember chatting with my mom while she (or I) was ironing or folding wash. Not sure why, but maybe there’s something there for moms and daughters.
  • Game gabble: Owen is a gamer, and he always has been. So often he’s opened up most to me or my husband during games of War, Battleship, Monopoly, or Rummy. Again, it’s the busy hands and relaxed atmosphere that may help.

how to talk to kids about school | teachmama.com

print it out: how to talk to kids about school 2014 teachmama.com

Now.  What should you ask? Though I’m no expert, from what I’ve heard and read, you should do a whole lot more listening than talking. We want our kids to know that we’re listening to what they say and that our ears are open. So put the cell phones down. Close the laptop. Let that iPad rest. And when you do say something, paraphrasing is key. It’s like putting money in the bank. When you paraphrase, you’re simply putting what your child just said into your own words. When you paraphrase, it lets your kiddos know that you’re listening. And sometimes when you ask questions that count–that get them thinking or get them interested, they’re more likely to answer. Consider asking: 

  • What book are you reading?
  • What was the best part of your lunch?
  • Who was absent from class today?
  • Who was on the morning announcements?
  • What did you play in PE?
  • Will you let me guess your favorite part of the morning/ afternoon/ day?
  • If your day was a movie, what would the title be?
  • What color was your day?
  • Which Olympic medal would you give today?
  • What do you hope is different tomorrow?

And really? Cross your fingers. But first, print out this pretty little cheat cheet: how to talk to kids about school 2014 teachmama.com . . . and have an awesome year!

Do you have any secrets that work for you? I’d love to hear them! Leave them in the comments! Check out the other two posts that will help make this year awesome: happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal           easy ways to support teachers: back to school #quakerup | teachmama.com

fyi: Thank you to Quaker and AdoptaClassroom.org for creating this program. I am proud to be a Quaker Classroom Ambassador.  Quaker is providing the prizes for this program at no cost to me. This program is not administered or sponsored by Quaker or its affiliates, but solely by teach mama media, llc. 

shutterfly 40% off everything for labor day: teachmama fab find

ultimate healthy bundle | teachmama fab find

post contains affiliate links

 

 

 

Shutterfly Labor Day 40% Off - 300x250
 

teach mama fab find

 

So this is a little different, I know, but I think you’ll dig it.

I’ve been blogging for a long time now. A long time.  Almost six years.  Yikes.

Along the way I’ve become privy to some really awesome, totally worth-your-time (and your dime) deals.  A lot of them are affiliate deals–meaning I share them, you buy them, and I get a teeny, tiny percentage of the sale, like a lot of the Amazon links you see on the site.

And though you might think it’s shady, it’s not. I only share things that I think are worth it–things that I like or that I talk about, and that I truly think your kids, your family, or you will dig.

I also am a part of a handful of affiliate organizations–groups that make these awesome deals so that bloggers can share them, companies get their products out, and blog readers can be winners.

So I’m going to try to share more of them.

That’s it.

I’ll try to do it with some regularity, but I can’t make any guarantees. All I know is that as the holidays approach, these deals start piling up.

So here we go. . .

My plan is to keep these short and sweet.  Because seriously? We’re all crazy busy.

  • Shutterfly 40% off Everything–Teachmama Fab Find:

Simply click below to grab this deal.

Shutterfly Labor Day 40% Off - 300x250

I’m thinking that with as many gorgeous beachy family photos as I’ve seen come across my facebook, instagram, and twitter feeds in the last few weeks, many of you have your holiday photos all ready.

So over Labor Day weekend, while your friends are out closing down their beach houses or lounging at the pool, take a minute to order your holiday cards and get 40% off of your order.

Or order a few canvases for your living room.

Or order a few framed photos for family members.

Or catch up on your family photo books.

Or a cool photo iPhone case. Or something.

Whatever you choose, 40% off everything at Shutterfly seems pretty good to me.   AND? If you’re new to Shutterfly, you can get 45% off. Bam

Here’s how:

1. Visit Shutterfly between now and 9/3/14

2. Shop.

3.  Use the code: LABORDAY40

New to Shutterfly?  Use the code NEWSURPRISE for 45% off of your order.

 

Shutterfly Labor Day 40% Off - 728x90

 

 

 

 

Enjoy! And seriously? How happy will you be to have part of your holiday shopping done by Labor Day? Serious win.

fyi: I am an affilliate partner of Shutterfly.

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

post contains affiliate links

 

 

 

what to do with swim ribbons  teachmama.com.pngOur swim and dive season has been over now for two weeks, but we’ve done more post-season celebrating this year than ever before.

Usually, as soon as we wrap up the banquet, swim ribbons get shoved in a drawer, meet caps get put away, and trophies are given a home on the bedroom shelf.

And then we move quickly into part two of our summer: everything after swim and dive.

Swim and dive season comes and goes–just like that.  Fast and furious and then bam. Over.

But this year, we decided to carry on the celebration a little longer by parading the awesome throughout our house.

Instead of piling up those ribbons and finding them a home on a shelf or in a drawer, we created a gorgeous swim ribbon garland.

It’s beautiful. And it’s simple, and it’s the story of the kids’ swim and dive season.

Here’s the skinny. .  .

  • Swim Ribbon Garland–What to do with Summer Swim Ribbons: I do need to clarify something.

 

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

 

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

 

The Swim Ribbon Garland was not created to brag.

It was not created to be competitive or bratty or nasty.

It was created to celebrate our kids’ accomplishments throughout the season and to remind them that hard work pays off.

That’s it.

 

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

 

And though it was super-simple to make, it turned out really, really pretty.

And it’s been the focus of many conversations that are totally worth having:

  • Can you believe how much you improved over the season?
  • Remember how nervous you were for your first IM but how proud you felt after finishing?
  • This was the meet you surprised everyone–including you!–and came in first place!
  • That was the longest afternoon ever, but you worked hard and got through it!
  • Even though you disqualified in this event, you still shook everyone’s hand after the race.
  • [Another swimmer friend] beat you in this race by less than a second; I know you were disappointed to lose, but you never once acted like a sore loser. 

 

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

 

To make the swim ribbon garland, we simply grabbed a large needle and some embroidery thread (the kind we use to make friendship bracelets). The needle was large enough to fit the thread through but small enough to fit under the tiny top of the ribbons.

I asked Maddy, Owen, and Cora if they wanted their ribbons arranged in any particular way–by color, date, award, etc. Only Cora had an order preference, so she put hers in order, and I strung them from her direction.

 

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

swim ribbon garland: what to do with summer swim ribbons

 

Because Cora had significantly fewer ribbons this year compared to Maddy and Owen, we added some of her ribbons from last year. Not a big deal.

She knew where they were, she grabbed them, and we added them. Done and done.

Thinking about the possibilities for ‘sideline’ learning with the swim ribbon garland has me nearly nutty. We can talk about:

  • total number of first, second, third, etc. awards;
  • total number of awards;
  • which person has more of each color;
  • who has the most (and least) amount of (color, score, etc.);
  • total time in each event;
  • amount of time gained/ lost throughout season;
  • so many ideas!

 

And really? That’s it. Just a quickie, fun, no-sew way to remind your child of how special he is.

What do YOU do with your kids’ ribbons? Let us know! Happy sewing and stringing those ribbons!

 

 

fyi: affiliate links are used in this post

 

 

make a kid-friendly kitchen without a major renovation

make a kid-friendly kitchen without a major renovation teachmama.com.png

sponsored post

 

 

 

make a kid-friendly kitchen without a major renovation  teachmama.com.pngGrowing up, I always remember my mom saying that she always wanted her four girls to be comfortable in the kitchen.

She wanted us to bake, cook, learn, have fun, and take risks–and for as long as I can remember, that’s what we did. I always knew I wanted to do the same exact thing with my kids one day.

And though my kids have been cracking eggs and measuring ingredients and making messes in the kitchen since they were tiny, I think that’s only half the battle.

Kids not only need to have an open invitation to try things in the kitchen, they also need to feel comfortable in the kitchen. They need to know that the kitchen is theirs, too.

You don’t need to do a huge overhaul or massive, million-dollar renovation to make your kitchen kid-friendly. No way. Who has time for that?  Who has the money for that?

Instead, any family can make small changes that pack a powerful punch.

Here are five super-easy tips for making your kitchen kid-friendly. Easier than you think.

Your kids will thank you.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Make a Kid-Friendly Kitchen Without a Major Renovation: Of course children always, always, always need to be supervised in the kitchen no matter what they’re doing.

That goes without saying.

But they also need to know where to find things, be able to reach things, and know how to do things on their own so they can grow more confident and capable.

Take a look at our 5 tips for making a kid-friendly kitchen:

fyi: The teachmama.com youtube channel is all about sharing quick teaching tips, reading strategies, and parenting tricks with parents and caregivers.

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make a kid-friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

make a kid-friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

Teaching kids how to use the microwave and other appliances safely is a must. And seriously, by looking a little more closely at what you already have, you may be surprised at how things can function.

I had no idea that our microwave had automatic melting options for butter or chocolate until I stepped back and helped Cora one afternoon.

kid friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

kid friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

kid friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

It’s not always easy to let go, but once you let your kids take the lead, it’s amazing where they will take you.

Maddy stumbled upon a recipe for baked tofu bites, which she decided she wanted to make. We never eat tofu. We (gasp!) weren’t even 100% sure what tofu was or where it was located in the grocery store.

But we found it, she made it, and we loved it.

It was a learning experience for the whole family–and I’m not sure Maddy would have taken the risk if she wasn’t so comfortable in our kitchen.

Want to read a little bit more about kids in the kitchen?

Click on the photos below. . . 

kids-who-can-rock-it-in-the-kitchen-teachmama.com-cover-.png

get your kids to try new foods

fyi: This is a sponsored post, written as part of the Whirlpool Ambassador program. As always, opinions and ideas are my own, influenced only by my experience as an educator and parent and my three little ones who are learning to really ‘rock it’ in the kitchen.  

Want to know more about the appliances we have in our kitchen? We have (and love!) the  Whirlpool® 28 cu. ft. 4-Door Refrigerator, the Whirlpool Gold Series Dishwasher with PowerScour option, theMicrowave Hood Combination with AccuPop Cycle, and the Double Oven Gas Range with Convection Cooking. True. Love. Forever with these. Seriously TLF.

how to turn a t-shirt into cool tank top: 10 min or less

how to turn an old tshirt to cool tank teachmama.com.png

how to turn an old t-shirt into cool tank: 10 min or less

We’re knee-deep into swim and dive season, and with three kids who participate in our neighborhood swim team and dive team, we’re crazy busy.

Two or three meets each week and practice every day.

It’ll all come to a screeching halt in just a few weeks, though, and the kids will be twiddling their thumbs and pestering each other between tabletop surprises and Fun Sticks.

This past week our spirit theme was red, white, and blue, with tie-dying t-shirts being a huge part of the patriotic attire. The night before the spirit pep rally, when all the tie-dying was to be done, we realized that we didn’t have plain t-shirts for the kids to dye. 

It was late. I was tired. And I was not going to run out to the store. No way, Jose.

So we scoured our dressers, closets, and under the bed boxes for a few white shirts that Maddy, Owen, and Cora could use.

And to our excitement, we found a few too-small t-shirts that we bought for Owen so he had something to wear under his First Communion suit. 

I sent the shirts to the pool with the kids, knowing they’d come back dyed and ready for some TLC.

And it worked. We turned a few t-shirts into cool tanks in a matter of minutes. Ten minutes to be exact.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • How to Turn an Old T-Shirt into a Cool Tank–10 Minutes or Less:  

Really. Ten minutes max.

Check it out:

fyi: The teachmama.com youtube channel is all about sharing quick teaching tips, reading strategies, and parenting tricks with parents and caregivers.

It’s about empowering parents to be the best teachers they can be for their children. Subscribe here so you don’t miss a thing!

 

What do you think? Will you bling out your t-shirts with a few beads and cuts? Let us know!

And remember, if you are looking for some fun ways of keeping the kids busy this summer, we have what you need.  Do check out our 10-weeks of free super-cool activities for kids: tabletop surprises.

tabletop surprise email promo teachmama.com

 

10 ways to create a literacy rich environment

10 ways to create a literacy rich environment guest post by kategribble on teachmama.com

10 ways to create a literacy rich environment | guest post by kategribble on teachmama.com

The following Rockstar Sunday guest post is written by Kate of An Everyday Story. Kate is a former teacher who now homeschools her two littles using the Reggio Emilia Approach.

I love her blog, and you will too.

Check it out!

————————-

  • 10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment, by Kate Gribble

Hi everyone. We are an Australian homeschooling family. I have two lovely little ones, Jack (5yrs) and Sarah (3yrs). Right from the beginning we knew we would homeschool. When my son was about a year old I can across the Reggio Emilia Approach.

As a former high school teacher (specialising in literacy and learning support), everything I read about Reggio challenged my fundamental beliefs of how children learn, but most significantly, how children should be taught.

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

The Reggio Emilia Approach is an innovative and inspiring approach to early childhood education. It values the child as strong, capable and resilient; rich with wonder and knowledge. The Reggio Emilia Approach believes every child brings with them deep curiosity and potential and that this innate curiosity drives their interest to understand their world and their place within it.

The Reggio Emilia Approach originated in the town (and surrounding areas) of Reggio Emilia in Northern Italy out of a movement towards progressive and cooperative early childhood education. Some of the fundamental principles of the Reggio Emilia Approach include:

  • Children are capable of constructing their own meaning –  they are driven by their interests to know and understand more
  • Children are communicators – Children are listened to with respect, believing that their questions and observations are an opportunity to learn and search together. It is a collaborative process; rather than the child asking a question and the adult offering the answers. The search is undertaken together.
  • The environment is the third teacher – The environment is recognised for its potential to inspire children. Whether a playroom or a classroom, each material is carefully selected to encourage children to delve deeper into their interests
  • A child-led project approach – Learning isn’t predetermined months in advance; learning emerges based on the children’s interests and questions
  • The Hundred Languages of Children – The belief that children learn in many different ways; each way as valuable as the next. The idea that children learn through painting and drawing, through building and dance, through drama and music and that each of these ways needs to be nurtured
  • Learning and play are not separated – They are interconnected. The Reggio Emilia Approach emphasises hands-on discovery learning that allows the child to use all their senses and all their languages to learn.

Today I thought I would share with you some of the ways we approach literacy and language learning in our homeschool:

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment

1: Including books on the play room shelves

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

2: Creating meaningful language in context – have an authentic reason for reading and writing

  • read to find answers
  • write lists
  • write questions
  • write postcards
  • write thank you cards
  • write instructions – recipe cards, treasure maps, rules for games

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

3: Providing writing materials with toys

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

4: Including literacy materials in the dress-ups

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

Literacy-rich-environment-labeling-drawings-An-Everyday-Story

5: Encouraging documentation

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

6: Using books in art experiences

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

7. Reading. Read widely and often

8: Using hands-on materials in favour of worksheets

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

9: Creating exploration shelves based on the kids’ interests which include reference books and writing materials

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

10 Ways to Create a Literacy Rich Environment | teachmama.com

10: Keeping a writing journal

I hope you have enjoyed a small peek inside our child-led Reggio-inspired homeschool. I look forward to seeing you all again soon over on my blog, An Everyday Story.

kate of an everyday story

Thank you so much, Kate!

Kate is a former high school teacher. Now, inspired by the Reggio Emilia Approach and Project-based Homeschooling, she is homeschooling her two children.  Find her at her blog, An Everyday Story, and connect with her on:

facebook | pinterest | instagram | google +  

Looking for more ways to create a literacy-focused environment? Stop by and follow these great educational Pinterest boards:

This post is part of our new Rockstar Sunday posts.  Each week, I will highlight one ‘rockstar’ in the parenting and education field.  These posts? Seriously awesome.

Have something you’d like to share that in some way relates to fun learning, school, technology, education, or parenting? For a short time we’ll be accepting Rockstar Sunday guest posts.

 rockstar sunday promo teachmama

The response to our Rockstar Sunday feature has been overwhelming. I am in awe of the ideas, submissions, and shares!

Having been in the blogging space for 5+ years, we know for sure that our readers are always up for fresh and fun ideas on literacy, math, technology, parenting, and learning in the every day. They love crafts, hands-on teaching ideas, printables, cooking with kids, and anything that makes their job as parents easier, better, and more fun.

You don’t have to have a blog of your own–just cool ideas to share! We look forward to hearing from you!

other posts in the series:

 

 

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen: 5 tips for every family

kids who can rock it in the kitchen teachmama.com

sponsored post

 

 

 

It’s a crazy busy time of the year, that I know.kids who can rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com cover

And for the last few weeks, I’ve had kids home sick just about every day, so believe me when I say I’m ready for summer.

Though summer means no homework, no projects, and no busy after school afternoons, it also means kids home. A lot of kids home a lot of the time.

Which is so totally awesome and also sometimes hard.

It means three kids home for three meals a day. It means lots of food prep and a lot of food clean-up.

So this year, along with our summer of Tabletop Surprises, we’re also doing a whole lot more to get our kids active in the kitchen.  Bam. Just like that.

Kids who know the kitchen, own the kitchen, and enjoy the kitchen.

Maddy, Owen, and Cora are still rocking it out in the laundry department (three cheers for Wash Warriors!), so next up? They’ll rock it in the kitchen. Big time.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • 5 Tips for Raising Kids Who Can Rock it in the Kitchen:

If we don’t start early with giving our kids some ownership of the everyday household jobs, it’ll just get more difficult to do so as they get older.  Right?  Right.

What do I mean by ‘rock it’ in the kitchen? I mean: Can kids hold their own in the kitchen?

Can they fix themselves a snack? Get breakfast together? Find ingredients to make a cake? Know how to whip up some scrambled eggs or a turkey sandy?

Do they feel like the kitchen is theirs and that they belong there?

They don’t have to be superstars. They just need to be able to rock it if they need to.

Here’s how:

kids who can rock it in the kitchen  teachmama.com

1.  Make your kitchen kid-friendly.

Even if you can’t make major changes in your kitchen layout, designate a few child-only drawers low enough for kids to reach and that hold only their dishes, cups, and flatware.  This will make unloading the dishwasher and gathering plates for mealtime easier.

get kids to rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com

get kids to rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com

Keeping and storing food in places that kids can reach also makes sense if you want kids to learn to prepare snacks and simple meals–which we definitely do.

We’ve really tried to keep our fridge kid-friendly by keeping fruits and veggies, yogurt and snacks within arms’ reach, and we have worked as a family to decide the best ‘homes’ for our pantry and staples. 

I’ve been surprised at some of the choices the kids have made, but I’ve gone with it.  And I’ve found that when you give kids a chance to make the choices, the kids are more likely to feel as if the kitchen is ‘theirs’.

kids who can rock it in the kitchen  helper each day  teachmama.com.png

2.  Choose one helper each day.

Make one child your ‘special helper’ each day. That child helps you prepare meals, set the table, and act as your assistant chef.  This is a great way to allow kids to experience serious hands-on learning in the kitchen each day.

One of my friends shared with me that she did this with her kids, and ever since, I’ve done the same.

We align our ‘helper’ with whomever’s day it is, so there’s never a question about whose turn it is. We simply check the calendar, and that person is my right-hand guy (or girl) for chopping, stirring, adding, and tasting.

kids who can rock it in the kitchen  teachmama

3.  Let them make menu choices.

At the beginning of the week, sit down as a family and choose the meals for that week, looking at recipe books, your favorite sites, etc. Make a grocery list, set aside coupons, and get ready to assemble ingredients!

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen helper   teachmama.com.png

This is easier said than done, I know.  But the menu-planning not only gets all stakeholders involved in the process, but it even saves families serious dinero in the long run.

We honestly don’t go crazy with trying to find new recipes each week, especially during busy times; we usually stick with the staples.

But this summer we’ll for sure explore some new dishes and let each person research, plan, and prepare the meal. We’ve talked about this–and everyone’s totally psyched. Talk about a great way of getting kids to try new foods and learn at the same time!

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen helper trust | teachmama.com

4.  Show your kids that you trust them.

Give kids space in the kitchen.

Let them help you unload the dishwasher, put away groceries, measure ingredients, and crack their own eggs.   It might not always be pretty, but you will slowly grow confident kids in the kitchen.

I’ll never forget the time years and years ago that a teeny, tiny Owen tried to add ‘a few shakes of salt’ to our banana muffins and dropped the whole salt shaker into the mix.  Or the time Maddy lost her balance while adding chocolate chips to cookie batter and fell into the bowl, tipping the whole thing onto the counter.

Or the time Cora tried to crack an egg and instead crushed the whole thing in her hands.

Mistakes happen, and often, kitchen floors are a complete mess after kids are cooking. But kids need a chance to try because they need to learn.

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen helper FUN | teachmama.com
5.  Make being in the kitchen fun.

Play music.  Dance around. Play games where and when you can, and make being there a relaxing and exciting place. It’s all about the attitude!

Our kids have always loved having their own child-sized aprons. You can find them inexpensive at thrift shops, or you can even make your own.  (Confession: my amazing and talented mother-in-law made some for our kids–lucky us!)   I have also found some super-cute ones on Etsy.

It really doesn’t matter where you get them, but having aprons makes my kids at least feel like cooking is a little bit more fun. Like when they walk into the kitchen on their day, they throw on their apron, and they’re ready for business.

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get kids to rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com

check out this cool, easy pdf that I (no joke!) helped Whirlpool create: Whirlpool_5TipsForKitchenKids

What do you think? Are your kids active in the kitchen this way?

Do you think they could be with a little effort?  I’d love to hear it!

fyi: This is a sponsored post, written as part of the Whirlpool Ambassador program. As always, opinions and ideas are my own, influenced only by my experience as an educator and parent and my three little ones who are learning to really ‘rock it’ in the kitchen.  Affiliate link used for apron.

Want to know more about the appliances we have in our kitchen? We have (and love!) the  Whirlpool® 28 cu. ft. 4-Door Refrigerator, the Whirlpool Gold Series Dishwasher with PowerScour option, the Microwave Hood Combination with AccuPop Cycle, and the Double Oven Gas Range with Convection Cooking. True. Love. Forever with these. Seriously TLF.

giving kids choices: parenting trick that saved my sanity

giving kids choices: parenting trick that saved my sanity

Originally published 1/25/09 but totally worth a re-share!

 

the parenting trick that saved my sanity: choices | teachmama.comOnce an a while, instead of sharing what secret little lesson I’ve stuck into our day, I’m going to share a Quick Trick that works (more often than not) for me or for one of my pals.

Some days, as most parents know, things just don’t go the way you’d hoped and it’s all you can do to make it through the day. This parenting thing is tough, and there’s no rest for the weary.

So my Quick Trick might focus on anything from parenting to preschool, healthy habits to a happy household.

Most likely, I’ve stolen the idea from someone, somewhere else and made it my own.  Teachers are the best, most practiced thieves, you know.

So here we go. . .

This May Change Your Life:
(okay, or maybe just a tiny part of it)

  • Give children two positive choices as a way of setting limits. Here is the formula:
  1. You may ____ or _____.
  2. What is your choice?
  3. You chose ____!
  • For older children, try:
  1. Feel free to ____ or ____. OR,
  2. Which of these options would be better for you, ____ or ____?
  • When Owen doesn’t want to get dressed in the morning, I try: Hmmmm, what will Owen choose to put on first, his pants or his shirt? Awesome! He chose to put on his shirt first this morning!
  • When we’re leaving a friend’s house: I wonder if Maddy will choose to put on her coat or her boots first. . . Yesterday she put on her boots first. What will she choose today? . . .
  • When we’re trying to clean up: Will Owen choose to put away these cars first or the puzzles?

It does sound strange at first, I know, but after awhile, I was totally surprised at how this worked and got my little ones moving. The choices have to positive, though, and that’s the tough part initially. Saying, Okay, feel free to clean up this mess or go to your room, won’t cut it. Instead try, This room is a mess. Are you going to choose to put the puzzles or the Polly Pockets away first?

I’m a huge, huge fan of Dr. Becky Bailey’s Easy to Love, Difficult to Discipline, and although it is a constant challenge for me to incorporate all of her principles into my daily routine, I find that her philosophy of discipline and parenting is really worth exploring.

Dr. Bailey says, Discipline is not a technique to use on children. It is a way of life to model for children.

And that’s the hard part for me.

The emotional, quick-tempered Irish girl I am heard myself saying early on (to my then 2-yr old), You better stop crying, or I’ll give you something to cry about! I stopped myself, totally freaked out, and knew that I was in desperate need of a paradigm shift–or I’d be eaten alive by my own kids. It is not easy–or natural–for me as a parent to take a deep breath and think before I speak to my whining, crying, cranky child who’s asking me for the gazillionth time to go outside, for another snack, to watch tv, or find a missing doll shoe.

So reading–and re-reading–and picking out the parts make sense to me from Dr. Bailey’s book has helped me to try to be more conscious of the way I interact with my children during both the easy and more difficult times so that discipline becomes, like she says, a way of life to model for them. Much easier said than done, but I’m trying to do my best, just like we all are.