let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors | teachmama.com

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let them play  importance of free time outdoors for kids  teachmama.com.png

It’s easy for parents to fall into the trap of thinking that summer means camps, amusement parks, pool trips, beach, camping, picnics, and activities nonstop.  Busy, busy, busy.

And when we’re not going, going, going, many of us feel guilty.

Like our kids always must be doing something.

And it’s easy for parents to fall into the trap of thinking that ‘downtime’ means ‘plugged in’ time: free play on an electronic device–a tablet, phone, iPod, computer, DS, Wii, or whatever.  Our kids are learning, right? And having fun? So it’s all good.

But what I am realizing more this summer than ever is that our kids need down time outdoors.

They need it for their mind, body, and spirit.

Like good, ole-fashioned nothing planned, nothing scheduled, just backyard, outdoor fun.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Let Kids Play–Remembering the Importance of Free Time Outdoors:  I think because my kids are getting older–10, 8, and 7–that it’s easy for me to forget that they still really need a whole lot of free play time outdoors.

Though it’s no secret that I am an advocate for parents doing what they can to sneak in some learning into their children’s days (it’s what I’ve been writing about for almost six years now–and boy, the tabletop surprises have really taken off!), I’ve also written many times about the importance of free play and time outdoors.

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

And I still often get emails and questions:

How can parents set kids up for free time outdoors? 

What do you say when you ‘unleash’ your kids in the wilds of your back yard and they mope around, complaining that they ‘don’t have anything to doooooooo’?

My kids don’t have neighbor friends like yours do. How do they play outside alone?

How do you ‘force’ your kids to play outdoors if the kids don’t really like being outside? 

 

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

 

I don’t know all of the answers, but I do know this: some kids need a little help. They need a little nudge. They need a little guidance in how to play and what to do when they’re handed free time on a silver platter, and here’s how parents can help:

  • Ask questions:Why do you think this bush has thorns? What do you see over there hiding in the grass? How many sounds do you hear? 
  • Make observations: I cannot believe how gorgeous that bird’s feathers are!  Look at those tiny toadstools!  Have you ever seen a leaf with so many colors?

 

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

 

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

 

  • Get dirty: Jump in the puddle at the end of your front staircase!  Splash in the muddy water under your swings!  Tear apart a flower that is on its last leg!
  • Be still: Lay on a blanket and look at the clouds. Just sit in the sunlight on a porch swing and enjoy the sun on your face.
  • Take risks: Put a few peanuts out on the porch and see if the squirrels come for a snack.  Buy a bag of birdseed and feed the birds. Look under a rock and see what’s there.

 

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

We’re pretty sure that Cora pulled apart a walnut here. . . we think.

 

  • Move out of your comfort zone: If your kids aren’t comfortable outside, could it be because you’re not 100% comfortable outdoors? Think about it. Try to spend a little bit more unstructured time outdoors if you can, and drag your kids along. See if it gets easier. See if it becomes more natural as time goes on.
  • Play together: Throw a baseball with your kiddo. Kick a soccer ball. Bounce a tennis ball. Jump rope. Blow bubbles. Dig in the dirt. Plant a garden. Do anything. Just do it together.

It doesn’t matter what you do; the goal is just to get kids outside and eventually to have them enjoy it. Really!

 

let kids play: remembering the importance of free time outdoors

 

Psychology Today ran an article in April 2014 by Darcia Narvaez, Ph.D. which explained the how the benefits of playing outdoors far outweighed the benefits of indoor play. Narvaez says:

Outdoors, a child learns on multiple levels with each new adventure . . . With all of the imaginary castles, lands, creatures, the brain develops at a much faster rate than for those who play indoors. There are numerous effects. Not only do they become better learners, and do well in school, but they are more fun to be around (i.e. they make more friends)–everyone wants to play with the kid with the active imagination! Consequently, children will be much happier because, hey, they’re smart and they have a lot of friends. All of this comes from just playing outside; you can bake many loaves in the same oven.  (Psychology Today. “What’s Better: Indoor or Outdoor Play?” April 5, 2014)

Narvaez also goes on to explain the physical effects of outdoor play on children. She explains that starting outdoor play while kids are young will have long-lasting effects: Years down the road, the child will still be more active and less likely to be overweight. If you think about this, it makes perfect sense; teach a child when they’re young to love the outdoors and they will love it forever.  The article’s really worth reading, especially if your kiddos (or you!) need more convincing. 

And really, that’s it. Just a good reminder for everyone to give our kiddos the ‘go’ to play outdoors and to just be kids. Because really? They need it.  We all do.

 

fyi: This post was written as part of a partnership with Mosquito Squad.  May seem totally random, I know, but it’s because of Mosquito Squad that this year our family has really been able to enjoy our yard again.  Thank GOODNESS.  

Living in the hot, muggy DC Metro area means that we have our fair share of mosquitos. Up until this year, our yard was basically unusable, awful, and painful from mid-June through mid-September; we would literally be eaten alive by mosquitos at any time of the day. This year, it’s been incredible and a totally different experience. Mosquito Squad takes care of our yard, and we are  happy campers (except thank goodness we’re not really camping–).   

As always, my opinions are all my own, influenced only by my experience as an educator and a parent, and of course by my three little outdoor explorers. 

find out more about Mosquito Squad | find answers to FAQ about Mosquito Squad 

tweet with Mosquito Squad (find your local branch and connect from there!)

@MosquitoMDsquad   |  Facebook chat with Mosquito Squad 

MosquitoMDsquad on Pinterest  |  MD Mosquito Squad blog  |   MD Mosquito squad on g+

what to say when kids make reading mistakes

what to say when kids make reading mistakes teachmama.com

originally published on 8/5/10 but sharing again because we all need these refreshers. . . 

 

what to say when kids make reading mistakes teachmama.comSo what should you say when a child makes mistake during reading?

I’ve been asked this question so many times by my friends, by parents of students I tutor, and by many, many readers of this blog.

And because we’ve run into this situation most recently this week after our trip to the library for fish books, I thought I’d share some ways that parents–and teachers–can handle those tough, uncomfortable times when kids make reading mistakes.

These are ways that I handle times when Maddy makes mistakes, these are the things I said when I listened to her classmates read when I volunteered at her school, and these are things I say when I’m tutoring and working with students.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • What to Say When Kids Make Reading Mistakes: Sure, our first inclination is to just give kiddos the word–especially if we’re in a time crunch or if the child is an especially slow reader.

Child: Something must be wr-wr wh-whh. Wrrroooo. Wruu. I don’t know.

Parent: It’s ‘wrong’. ‘Wrong.’ ‘Something must be wrong with. . .’

Child: Oh. ‘Something must be wrong with the sun to-today.’

The kiddo gets off easy and will soon learn that all he has to do is make some feeble attempts at sounding out a word in order to get Mom or Dad–or teacher–to throw him the rope.

We’ve all done it, but it sure isn’t a great habit.

 

When kids blindly choose a book to read,they may run into some reading problemos. Teach them to choose just right books.

There are ways we can use these exciting and (sometimes) trying times during emerging reader read-alouds as jumping off points for learning. If we just keep a few phrases in our back pockets, our kids really might start to become stronger readers before our eyes. . .

When kids won’t even try to sound out a word or they won’t budge, say:

  • Think about the letters you recognize and the sounds they make. What sound does this letter make (point to first letter)? Let me hear you make the sound. Now what sound does this letter make (point to second letter)? Let’s put the sounds together. . .
  • Look at the letters you know in the word and the picture on the page. The picture is here to help you. Think about the sound this letter makes (point to first letter of word) and what you see in the picture. . .

what to say when kids make reading mistakes

  • Think about what’s going on in this story. You just read, (read previous line). Look at the picture, look at the word, and think about what might happen next.
  • Skip the word you don’t know and move to the next word you can read.
  • You might not recognize this word, but I know you know this word (cover the first letter and let him read the part he knows—at from ‘bat’). Think about the sound that ‘b’ makes, put the sounds together, and you’ll have it!
  • You just read this word on the previous page, and you read it correctly. Use your detective eyes, find the word on the other page, and see if that helps.

what to say when kids make reading mistakes

When a child makes an error on a page and moves right on by like nothing happened, even if what she read makes no sense: Let her go! Don’t interrupt mid-reading; instead consider saying at the end of the sentence, phrase, or paragraph:

  • Are you correct?
  • Read it again and check closely.
  • Can you find the tricky part?
  • It’s in this line.
  • I’ll point it out and help you find it.

Use this prompt occasionally even when your child reads the words correctly!

That way she’ll get in the habit of self-monitoring while she’s reading solo.

Remember also to use the above prompts in order–that way beginning with a general question (Are you correct?) will have her go back and check her work without your help and specific direction!

what to say when kids make reading mistakes

what to say when kids make reading mistakes | teachmama.com

If you’d like to have these prompts as a pdf, you may download what to say when kids make reading mistakes.  It has a little more explanation and information and will hopefully be something worthwhile to keep on hand!

Cheers, and happy reading during this incredibly exciting journey!

make a kid-friendly kitchen without a major renovation

make a kid-friendly kitchen without a major renovation teachmama.com.png

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make a kid-friendly kitchen without a major renovation  teachmama.com.pngGrowing up, I always remember my mom saying that she always wanted her four girls to be comfortable in the kitchen.

She wanted us to bake, cook, learn, have fun, and take risks–and for as long as I can remember, that’s what we did. I always knew I wanted to do the same exact thing with my kids one day.

And though my kids have been cracking eggs and measuring ingredients and making messes in the kitchen since they were tiny, I think that’s only half the battle.

Kids not only need to have an open invitation to try things in the kitchen, they also need to feel comfortable in the kitchen. They need to know that the kitchen is theirs, too.

You don’t need to do a huge overhaul or massive, million-dollar renovation to make your kitchen kid-friendly. No way. Who has time for that?  Who has the money for that?

Instead, any family can make small changes that pack a powerful punch.

Here are five super-easy tips for making your kitchen kid-friendly. Easier than you think.

Your kids will thank you.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Make a Kid-Friendly Kitchen Without a Major Renovation: Of course children always, always, always need to be supervised in the kitchen no matter what they’re doing.

That goes without saying.

But they also need to know where to find things, be able to reach things, and know how to do things on their own so they can grow more confident and capable.

Take a look at our 5 tips for making a kid-friendly kitchen:

fyi: The teachmama.com youtube channel is all about sharing quick teaching tips, reading strategies, and parenting tricks with parents and caregivers.

It’s about empowering parents to be the best teachers they can be for their children. Subscribe here so you don’t miss a thing!

make a kid-friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

make a kid-friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

Teaching kids how to use the microwave and other appliances safely is a must. And seriously, by looking a little more closely at what you already have, you may be surprised at how things can function.

I had no idea that our microwave had automatic melting options for butter or chocolate until I stepped back and helped Cora one afternoon.

kid friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

kid friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

kid friendly kitchen | teachmama.com

It’s not always easy to let go, but once you let your kids take the lead, it’s amazing where they will take you.

Maddy stumbled upon a recipe for baked tofu bites, which she decided she wanted to make. We never eat tofu. We (gasp!) weren’t even 100% sure what tofu was or where it was located in the grocery store.

But we found it, she made it, and we loved it.

It was a learning experience for the whole family–and I’m not sure Maddy would have taken the risk if she wasn’t so comfortable in our kitchen.

Want to read a little bit more about kids in the kitchen?

Click on the photos below. . . 

kids-who-can-rock-it-in-the-kitchen-teachmama.com-cover-.png

get your kids to try new foods

fyi: This is a sponsored post, written as part of the Whirlpool Ambassador program. As always, opinions and ideas are my own, influenced only by my experience as an educator and parent and my three little ones who are learning to really ‘rock it’ in the kitchen.  

Want to know more about the appliances we have in our kitchen? We have (and love!) the  Whirlpool® 28 cu. ft. 4-Door Refrigerator, the Whirlpool Gold Series Dishwasher with PowerScour option, theMicrowave Hood Combination with AccuPop Cycle, and the Double Oven Gas Range with Convection Cooking. True. Love. Forever with these. Seriously TLF.

how to keep kids hydrated in the summer: 6 cool ways

how to keep your kids hydrated | teachmama.com

how to keep kids hydrated in the summer: 6 cool ways

The following Rockstar Sunday guest post is written by smart and savvy Orlenad of Snotty Noses. Orlena is a mother of four and a doctor and she blogs.

What? How?

I wonder the same thing. I’m continually amazed.

Check it out!

————————-

  • How to Keep Kids Hydrated in the Summer, by Orlena Kerek

Last week it was definitely still spring. A slight breeze, a cloud here or there, a slightly British mother living in Spain, complaining about the lack of sun. Ahem.

Then on Monday, summer arrived. The two clouds disappeared, the wind stopped, the weather man said “32 degrees (Celsius, which equals about 90° F), but feels like 42° (Celsius which equals about 98° F)”.

I’m not sure how that works, but it did. Even the locals were complaining.

My kids began to melt.

Since then I’ve been on “keeping the kids cool and hydrated” super power mum mode!

Small children, especially babies aren’t great at regulating their body temperature. It’s not difficult for them to become dehydrated if you don’t keep on top of their fluid intake.

how to keep kids hydrated in the summer: 6 cool ways

But there are lots of great, fun ways to keep them drinking.

1.  Drink mostly water. It’s the best fluid for you when you’re well. But yes, I know, I have 4 children. They drink quite a lot of water (when they get thirsty it’s what they ask for.) If they don’t want water, diluted fruit juice or squash is fine but not good for teeth so best with meals.

2.  Use straws as a great way to get your kids drinking. You can get super amazing ones now. Ones that go round and round, or do squiggly shapes, or really really long ones that my kids love. (The 2 boys drank the entire jug in the picture between them over an afternoon.)

3.  Bring in the ice. Kids love ice, either in drinks or by itself, or to play with. Get some fun ice cube trays and you’ll be filling your freezer five times a day.

4.  Eat fruit. Some fruits are very high in water content and are great source of liquid. Our favourite is watermelon. I put it in the fridge so it’s refreshing and cool. A great, hydrating snack.

5.  Freeze everything. Make home made popsicles. I mostly use fruit, so mashed banana, cooked apple or peach, anything you fancy really. My recent favourite was a bit of chopped up mango that was looking a little sorry for itself and milk. If you don’t have a popsicle maker you can use the ice cube trays. If you run out of fruit, diluted cordial freezes well too. My toddler twins walk up to the freezer and ask for them whenever they like and as they’re just fruit, they make a great snack.

6.  Make water readily available. Children will drink when they’re thirsty if there is a drink available. I leave the toddler’s sippy cups on the floor so that they can help themselves. The older boys have cups on tables that they can reach. And they have cups with lids on to take to bed.

Children can really suffer in the heat and keeping them hydrated is important. A great way to check is to look at their wee (sorry I’ve been a doctor and mother for too long to get squeamish about such things.). It should be a nice clear yellowy colour. If it looks dark yellow encourage them to drink more.

 

How about you? Do you have any great tips to share that get your kids drinking?

 

how to keep kids hydrated in the summer: 6 cool ways

Thank you, thank you Orlena! GREAT ideas!

Orlena is a paediatric doctor (that’s a british pediatrician) or at least she was until she moved to Spain with her 4 small children and started blogging about children’s health, parenting and fun things to do. You can find her at snotty-noses.com/blog. She offers great pdf bribes if you sign up to her newsletter My Baby’s Sleep and 30 Tips to Get your Kids to Eat and LOVE Vegetables

 

 

Looking for more ways to create a literacy-focused environment? Stop by and follow these great educational Pinterest boards:

This post is part of our new Rockstar Sunday posts.  Each week, I will highlight one ‘rockstar’ in the parenting and education field.  These posts? Seriously awesome.

Have something you’d like to share that in some way relates to fun learning, school, technology, education, or parenting? For a short time we’ll be accepting Rockstar Sunday guest posts.

 rockstar sunday promo teachmama

The response to our Rockstar Sunday feature has been overwhelming. I am in awe of the ideas, submissions, and shares!

Having been in the blogging space for 5+ years, we know for sure that our readers are always up for fresh and fun ideas on literacy, math, technology, parenting, and learning in the every day. They love crafts, hands-on teaching ideas, printables, cooking with kids, and anything that makes their job as parents easier, better, and more fun.

You don’t have to have a blog of your own–just cool ideas to share! We look forward to hearing from you!

other posts in the series:

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

make a library plan teachmama.com

Kids can be a little silly when it comes to picking out their own books at the library. create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

Where some can easily head right on over to the section they want, grab the books they want, and quickly find a quiet, cozy spot to read, others need . . . a little more direction.

And believe me, I’m all for giving kids time to browse the shelves, look around, relax and explore.

But really.

Our kids are so totally lucky to have so many books at their fingertips. Let’s give them a little direction so they can make the most of a trip to the library or to their school media center.

So after chatting with my pal Heather, and after my own kids’ crazy library book experiences, I decided to create a little Library Plan sheet.  They work.

They help give kids focus when they’re faced with All. Those. Books.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Create a Library Plan–Make the Most of a Trip to the Library:

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

 

I am not lying when I say that in Owen’s first three years in elementary school, he brought the same random book about dogs home at least ten times. It was a small, hardcover book about chihuahuas. And the fifth time it landed on our kitchen table, I asked why he brought it home again, and he said Because I like it.

I suggested that he try searching for other books about chihuahuas or even other books about dogs, but he said, No. I like this one.

 

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

 

The next year, when the book ended up back at our house, I gave him a little more nudging. You’re sure you love that book that much? I mean, haven’t you memorized it by now? 

He assured me that he just ‘really liked it’.

What I learned is that Owen doesn’t really care about his library books. He really doesn’t.

His goal? Grab a book. Bring it back to his class. Bring it home.  Maybe take it out of his backpack, depending on the day–maybe not. Bring it back to school. Put it in the library bin. Done. Bam.  Check it off. Gimme the next thing.

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

 

So rather than have him do the same thing this summer–a time when we usually hit the library as a family pretty often–I decided it was time to make the Library Plan.

Heather asked me a while ago if I had anything she could use for her boys, and really, I didn’t.

But now I do.

Small enough to fit inside a pocket or in the cover of a current library book, the Library Plan is super-simple.

The Library Plan is here to download if you so choose: library book plan

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

library book plan  | help kids make the most of a trip to the library!

It includes a space for titles that kids might be seeking, authors, and subjects. And in case you do your book searching from home, accessing your library’s card catalog via the library website like we often do, there’s a spot for notes, too. I thought that would be a great space to write down call numbers, messages, anything you want to remember from your at-home searching.

The Library Plan also includes a ‘think’ spot where all sorts of topics and ideas are added. I’m hoping that as Maddy, Owen, and Cora fill out their Plan sheets, these ideas jog their minds and helps to give them some things to think about or look for at the library.

And that’s it.

We used the Library Plans as the first day of our Tabletop Surprises this week, and they worked.

Really, truly helped to keep our afternoon trip to the library focused and productive.

 

What do you think? Will these work for your kids or students? What should we add or change? Do let me know!

best books for reading under the stars: scholastic summer reading challenge

http://www.scholastic.com/ups/campaigns/src-2014

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This summer, the kids and I plan on doing a whole lot of reading. summertime reading under the stars  scholastic summer reading challenge.png

Reading at the pool, out on the porch, reading on a blanket on the grass out back. And a whole lot of reading under the stars.

Maybe not every night, but you better believe that we’re going to rock it out for a few backyard campouts this summer.  Complete with flashlights, s’mores, bugspray, and a whole lot of blankets, we’re going to make the most of our ‘staycation summer’.

And though camping isn’t a staple in our lives, we do want to try it. Okay, so we’ve never actually taken the kids camping. . . does that make us the worst parents ever?  I mean, aren’t there worse things?–

The theme of Scholastic’s Summer Reading Challenge this year is ‘Reading Under the Stars’, so we’ve decided that this is our summer to do it.

Camping. In our back yard.

But first, we’ll do a whole lot of reading about camping and the stars to build and activate schema–to get those brains moving and to prepare our kids for the big night.

With a little help from Scholastic, I’ve gathered a handful of the best books for reading under the stars.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Best Books for Reading Under the Stars–Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge:

If you’re going to do it, you might as well really do it up.

 

best books for reading under the stars | scholastic summer reading teachmama.com

Before the big camp-out, we’ll read a little bit about camping, the stars and space so that when we’re gazing up at the night sky, we can at least (maybe?) identify some of the pictures up there.

So that when we’re packing for our big camp-out we’ll know what to throw in the bags.

So that during the crazy camp-out, we’ll kind of know what to expect. Kind of.

best books for reading under the stars  teachmama.com .png

We’ll check out a few oldies but goodies and a few new-to-us books about reading under the stars: 

 

scholastic summer reading challenge

Have your kids help Scholastic break last year’s world record of 176,438,473 minutes read during the summer!

 

summertime reading | scholastic

 

And we’ll also do all we can to rock it with the Scholastic Reading Under the Stars Summer Reading Challenge.

Every year we participate in the Scholastic Summer Reading Challenge, and this summer is no different!

The deal?

  • We do it because reading rocks, and. . . well. . . kids need to read consistently and continually all summer long!
  • Summer reading should be fun, and this challenge is fun for kids; a free online reading timer, weekly challenges with rewards, prizes, and more.
  • There’s even a super-fun Summer Solstice Book Swap (via Google+ Hangout) on Thursday, June 19th at 9 p.m. EST with me (yay!) and my buddy, Allie McDonald of No Time for Flashcards.  Join us!!
  • Get more information and RSVP for the Google + hangout, click  here. To get some helpful tips before the Hangout, be sure to read my guide to planning your Summer Reading Book Review Party and Swap.

summertime reading | scholastic

summertime reading | scholastic

 

  • Kids can log their minutes and read big prizes;
  • Teachers can register students and track their progress;
  • Parents can download tons of free resources and articles about how to support literacy in the home and how to bring literacy home to their kids.
  • Awesome. Fun. Totally doing it.

And that’s it! Just a few little ways we’re slooooowly moving into the summer groove and slooooooly preparing ourselves for our big backyard camp-out!

 

Tell me: are you big into camping? Does your whole family go? 

But even more importantly: Is your family big into summer reading programs?  Why or why not?

Would love to hear your opinions in the comments!

 

fyi: This post was written as a partnership with Scholastic Circle.

Affiliate links are used within.

help kids start a blog: get them reading, writing, thinking, creating

help kids start a blog get them reading, writing, thinking, creating | teachmama.com

post contains affiliate links

 

 

How old should kids be before starting a blog?help kids start a blog get them reading, writing, thinking, creating | teachmama.com

Should kids even have their own blogs?

What should kids blog about? 

How should kids even set up a blog?

Is blogging safe for kids? 

—————–

Maddy has been asking me to help her start her own blog for months now.

Months and months and months and months.

And just like the awful parent I was when she asked me to let her join the dive team five years ago, I gave her the Um, well. . . let’s just think about it a little, okay, sweetheart? 

Dive team meant early–early!–practices and lots more on our summertime to-do list. It meant schlepping Owen and Cora around the town even more than we already did.

After a year or so of asking, I signed her up.

Now? Dive team has come to mean year-round training and has become one of Maddy’s–and Owen and Cora’s–most coveted activities.

Who knows if the situation will be the same with Maddy’s blogging, but after asking and asking and asking, we’ve finally got her all set up with her own blog.  After all, blogging does get kids reading, writing, thinking and creating. So we thought we’d give it a go.

She’s ten, and she’s blogging.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Help Kids Start a Blog–Get Them Reading, Writing, Thinking, and Creating:

You can totally use any device for blog writing, but Maddy has really stuck with our Acer C720P Chromebook.  

help kids start a blog: get them reading, writing, thinking, creating

This spring we were asked to try out the Acer C720P Chromebook, and so far, my kids love it.

It’s small, it’s quick, and it’s light. And? It’s touchscreen which makes it a cool combination of a laptop and tablet.  It’s a paired down version of our Intel AIO–which they also totally love–but which isn’t as portable as the Chromebook.

Anyway, here’s how I helped Maddy start a blog. . .

 

1.  We looked at examples of strong blogs. I’ve talked about the importance of modeling before, and with blog writing, it’s no different. The best advice I can give to parents with kids who want to blog is to start a blog themselves.

The big thing with student blogs is that the turnover rate is super-high.   Kids are busy. It’s hard for them to keep up with things, so it’s hard to keep up with blogging.

There are a few great ones to look at as examples, though:

help kids start a blog | teachmama.com

We also looked at this blog (ours, teachmama.com) and we looked at some of my good friends’ blogs. These are the women whom Maddy has grown to know over the last few years and whose children have become her good pals:

We talked about how these blogs were alike and different, how they covered different ‘niches’ and how they used things like layout, text, and photos.

 

2.  She and I sat down and filled out the blog brainstorm teachmama.com.

I created this handy little packet for a blog writing workshop I led at Digital Family Summit last year, and I have honestly handed it to a ton of friends and family members.

help kids start a blog brainstorm sheet  teachmama.com.png

blog brainstorm teachmama.com.

Essentially, it’s a quick guide for people who want to start a blog.

It has people reflect on a few blog-focus questions:

  • What do you do in your spare time?
  • What do you know a lot about?
  • How can you help others with your blog?

blog brainstorm sheet  teachmama.com.png

And it covers some logistical and safety questions as well:

  • Who will read your blog?
  • Do you want to include your name? personal photos? your location?
  • What adult will support you in your blog writing?

These questions are ones that the family should answer together, especially if your child is 13 or younger.  Every family is different, so every family’s decisions will be different. 

The blog brainstorm sheet also includes an empty calendar so soon-t0-be-bloggers can start an editorial calendar and a sheet filled with thought-provoking questions and topics which will (hopefully) help with blog writing.

If you want to download it and use it, go right ahead: blog brainstorm teachmama.com.dfs

Please, if you use it and share it (yay and thank you!) I’d appreciate if you shared from this blog post and not the pdf itself. Thank you!

 

help kids start a blog | teachmama.com

3.We went to wordpress.com to set up her site. 

Though this little bloggy blog here started on blogger.com, I’ve since moved to wordpress.org and am much more familiar with this platform.

I knew that if Maddy really began to take her blog seriously, we could quickly and easily move her from wordpress.com to wordpress.org.  Though there are differences between wordpress.com and wordpress.org, essentially blogs on wordpress.org are self-hosted so you end up maintaining more control over content and design.

And, even though wordpress.com’s Terms of Service clearly outline that users must be at least 13 years of age, I registered the blog under my own account.  That means that I will always have editing control over Maddy’s posts, photos, and content.

Other sites that are worth checking out for hosting kid blogs:

  • edublogs.com: no age limits with terms of service because it’s designed for students
  • kidblog.com: great for a classroom or very large family
  • Edmodo.com: incredible for connecting students in a class

If you know what you’re doing and want to head straight to buying your own domain name, try GoDaddy.com.

You may want to show your kiddos the video below from Edublogs: 

4. She started designing, writing, and creating. 

We’ve explored and played and created on picmonkey, which is the platform I use to create all of my photos. It’s easy. It’s intuitive. It’s fun for kids.  (And adults.)

And that’s that. I have always been right there, helping her upload photos and talking her through decisions, but really, she’s done it all on her own from there.   She goes in waves, like most kids with most things.

One month she’ll be nuts writing, taking photos and writing posts. Other times, she lets it go for a few weeks.

I have a feeling this summer will be a blog-busy one for one 10-year old in our house–which is fine with me!

 

Having second thoughts? Want a few beginner steps for your digital kid before they take on the blog?  Check out:

 

 

GoDaddy.com
 

fyi: I am in a partnership with Intel AIO . Through this partnership I gain access to content, product, or other forms of value. Affiliate links are used in this post.

 

what to ask teachers before school lets out

what parents must ask teachers before school ends

what parents must ask teachers before school ends

For many, school has already been released for the summer (yay!).

But for others, summer is right around the corner.

That means we have a few more days (or weeks for some of us up here in the Northeast!) to wrap things up and tie together those loose ends.  It also means we have our kids’ teachers on hand for just a little bit longer. 

And really? That’s awesome because come that last day, we know our teachers are ready for a serious break. They deserve it.

But there are a few things parents should ask teachers before everyone locks up classrooms, logs off of email, and heads for the shore.

I shared those two important questions over on Scholastic Parents Raise a Reader blog:

2 Things Every Parent Must Ask Teachers at the End of the Year.

Check it out.

And then? Let me know what you think.

  • Would you ask something else?
  • What do you usually ask teachers? 
  • How should parents better approach this subject? 

 

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen: 5 tips for every family

kids who can rock it in the kitchen teachmama.com

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It’s a crazy busy time of the year, that I know.kids who can rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com cover

And for the last few weeks, I’ve had kids home sick just about every day, so believe me when I say I’m ready for summer.

Though summer means no homework, no projects, and no busy after school afternoons, it also means kids home. A lot of kids home a lot of the time.

Which is so totally awesome and also sometimes hard.

It means three kids home for three meals a day. It means lots of food prep and a lot of food clean-up.

So this year, along with our summer of Tabletop Surprises, we’re also doing a whole lot more to get our kids active in the kitchen.  Bam. Just like that.

Kids who know the kitchen, own the kitchen, and enjoy the kitchen.

Maddy, Owen, and Cora are still rocking it out in the laundry department (three cheers for Wash Warriors!), so next up? They’ll rock it in the kitchen. Big time.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • 5 Tips for Raising Kids Who Can Rock it in the Kitchen:

If we don’t start early with giving our kids some ownership of the everyday household jobs, it’ll just get more difficult to do so as they get older.  Right?  Right.

What do I mean by ‘rock it’ in the kitchen? I mean: Can kids hold their own in the kitchen?

Can they fix themselves a snack? Get breakfast together? Find ingredients to make a cake? Know how to whip up some scrambled eggs or a turkey sandy?

Do they feel like the kitchen is theirs and that they belong there?

They don’t have to be superstars. They just need to be able to rock it if they need to.

Here’s how:

kids who can rock it in the kitchen  teachmama.com

1.  Make your kitchen kid-friendly.

Even if you can’t make major changes in your kitchen layout, designate a few child-only drawers low enough for kids to reach and that hold only their dishes, cups, and flatware.  This will make unloading the dishwasher and gathering plates for mealtime easier.

get kids to rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com

get kids to rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com

Keeping and storing food in places that kids can reach also makes sense if you want kids to learn to prepare snacks and simple meals–which we definitely do.

We’ve really tried to keep our fridge kid-friendly by keeping fruits and veggies, yogurt and snacks within arms’ reach, and we have worked as a family to decide the best ‘homes’ for our pantry and staples. 

I’ve been surprised at some of the choices the kids have made, but I’ve gone with it.  And I’ve found that when you give kids a chance to make the choices, the kids are more likely to feel as if the kitchen is ‘theirs’.

kids who can rock it in the kitchen  helper each day  teachmama.com.png

2.  Choose one helper each day.

Make one child your ‘special helper’ each day. That child helps you prepare meals, set the table, and act as your assistant chef.  This is a great way to allow kids to experience serious hands-on learning in the kitchen each day.

One of my friends shared with me that she did this with her kids, and ever since, I’ve done the same.

We align our ‘helper’ with whomever’s day it is, so there’s never a question about whose turn it is. We simply check the calendar, and that person is my right-hand guy (or girl) for chopping, stirring, adding, and tasting.

kids who can rock it in the kitchen  teachmama

3.  Let them make menu choices.

At the beginning of the week, sit down as a family and choose the meals for that week, looking at recipe books, your favorite sites, etc. Make a grocery list, set aside coupons, and get ready to assemble ingredients!

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen helper   teachmama.com.png

This is easier said than done, I know.  But the menu-planning not only gets all stakeholders involved in the process, but it even saves families serious dinero in the long run.

We honestly don’t go crazy with trying to find new recipes each week, especially during busy times; we usually stick with the staples.

But this summer we’ll for sure explore some new dishes and let each person research, plan, and prepare the meal. We’ve talked about this–and everyone’s totally psyched. Talk about a great way of getting kids to try new foods and learn at the same time!

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen helper trust | teachmama.com

4.  Show your kids that you trust them.

Give kids space in the kitchen.

Let them help you unload the dishwasher, put away groceries, measure ingredients, and crack their own eggs.   It might not always be pretty, but you will slowly grow confident kids in the kitchen.

I’ll never forget the time years and years ago that a teeny, tiny Owen tried to add ‘a few shakes of salt’ to our banana muffins and dropped the whole salt shaker into the mix.  Or the time Maddy lost her balance while adding chocolate chips to cookie batter and fell into the bowl, tipping the whole thing onto the counter.

Or the time Cora tried to crack an egg and instead crushed the whole thing in her hands.

Mistakes happen, and often, kitchen floors are a complete mess after kids are cooking. But kids need a chance to try because they need to learn.

raising kids who can rock it in the kitchen helper FUN | teachmama.com
5.  Make being in the kitchen fun.

Play music.  Dance around. Play games where and when you can, and make being there a relaxing and exciting place. It’s all about the attitude!

Our kids have always loved having their own child-sized aprons. You can find them inexpensive at thrift shops, or you can even make your own.  (Confession: my amazing and talented mother-in-law made some for our kids–lucky us!)   I have also found some super-cute ones on Etsy.

It really doesn’t matter where you get them, but having aprons makes my kids at least feel like cooking is a little bit more fun. Like when they walk into the kitchen on their day, they throw on their apron, and they’re ready for business.

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get kids to rock it in the kitchen | teachmama.com

check out this cool, easy pdf that I (no joke!) helped Whirlpool create: Whirlpool_5TipsForKitchenKids

What do you think? Are your kids active in the kitchen this way?

Do you think they could be with a little effort?  I’d love to hear it!

fyi: This is a sponsored post, written as part of the Whirlpool Ambassador program. As always, opinions and ideas are my own, influenced only by my experience as an educator and parent and my three little ones who are learning to really ‘rock it’ in the kitchen.  Affiliate link used for apron.

Want to know more about the appliances we have in our kitchen? We have (and love!) the  Whirlpool® 28 cu. ft. 4-Door Refrigerator, the Whirlpool Gold Series Dishwasher with PowerScour option, the Microwave Hood Combination with AccuPop Cycle, and the Double Oven Gas Range with Convection Cooking. True. Love. Forever with these. Seriously TLF.

5 things every mom needs to know but doesn’t want to hear: what I learned at mom 2.0

what every mom needs to know mom 2.0 summit teachmama.com.png

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This spring has proven to be a crazy busy for us.

what every mom needs to know  mom 2.0 summit  teachmama.com.png

It’s been insanely busy, but we’ve had a whole lot of happy in that mix, and for that we are grateful.

Add a few kids into the equation, along with homework, housework, after school activities, and a husband who’s busy learning the ropes during his first year as principal of an elementary school, and you have a pretty chaotic home front.

Last month, we made it to California as a family for the first time, and then shortly after returning, I ran my first (and most likely last!) half marathon with a few girlfriends. The training was a part time job in itself.

Our family will be rejoicing for Owen’s First Communion this weekend, and, along with Mother’s Day, I’d say it’s hard to top a weekend with plans like that.

But before I move ahead into the weekend’s joyous celebration and before I head to San Francisco next week for the PBS Annual meeting, I do want to step back and share a few things I learned last week.

Last week I was in Atlanta working with Whirlpool at the Mom 2.0 Summit. And though Mom 2.0 is a social media conference connecting bloggers with brands, I learned a ton that could be worthwhile to everyone—bloggers and non-bloggers alike–especially around Mother’s Day.

Sure, we busy moms don’t really want to hear one more thing about what we need to know or do or say, but this list? Worth your time.

These super-important messages were woven throughout the conference–they’re just a few things that every mother needs to know but doesn’t always want to hear.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • 5 Things Every Mother Needs to Know but Doesn’t Want to Hear:

You are teaching your kids    about beauty and confidence

1. you are teaching your kids about beauty and confidence

This was the most important take-away for me, maybe because I’m the mom of a 10 and 7 year old girl, or maybe because often I look in the mirror and frown back at my reflection, focusing on the wrinkles, tired eyes, and sun spots. This message stuck with me.

Here it is: You are teaching your kids–girls especially–about beauty and confidence, and you don’t even realize it.  You don’t even realize it.

The way you look at yourself in the mirror, the way you frown at yourself–or smile–speaks volumes about how your children should feel when they look at their reflection in the mirror.

A quick, must-see look at how important it is to like our reflections, to appreciate what we see, thanks to Dove:

Dove has been long known for their rockstar body image campaigns (remember the Real Beauty one?), the Girls Unstoppable one that just may feature our favorite roller skater in the whole universe?  This campaign rocked.

Especially during these formative, tween years, what we, as moms, do and say in front of our kids counts. Bigtime.  So? Take a deep breath, and do what you can to accept that #beautyis wherever you are and whomever you are with.

You are what beauty is, no matter who you are, what you look like, or what you may think.  And that’s a beautiful thing. Let’s live it.

 

portrait of amy mascott teachmama #beautyis

portrait of me, by cora, 7 yo. #LOVE #beautyis

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you are allowed to change your mind

2. you are allowed to change your mind

And really? Sometimes change is good.  A lot of the time, change is good.

You once really, really loved yoga and now you don’t? Stop going. Try something new.

You meet the same girls every week for a walk and are getting kinda sorta sick of it?  Take a break. Find a new way of spending that hour, and see how you feel.

Getting tired of the same job, same routine, day after day after day after day?   Change it. Somehow, any way you can.  Try something new.

Ready to take the plunge into the wilds of Twitter or Instagram? Do it and never look back.

Have you secretly, deep down inside, wanted to start your own blog?  Do it, girlfriend, and be proud of it.

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you are not able to do it alone

3. you are not able to do it all on your own

I repeat: you are not able to do it all.

This is one I need to hear and then get tattooed on my arm so I never forget it.

You. Are. Not. Able. To. Do. It. All.

So accept it and move forward.

And if you can’t outsource something, whether it be cleaning or cutting the grass or grocery shopping, find some way of getting help.

Can’t manage all of your work? Hire someone to help, even if it’s a tiny piece.

Think about what’s really important and do that.  Not all of it will get finished.

Channel your inner Elsa and Let. It. Go. Let it gooooooo. 

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you are crazy powerful

4. you are crazy powerful

You have enormous power as mom and influencer in your home.

You have enormous power as a member of the PTA, your church, your bookclub, your neighborhood home association.

You have enormous power as a user of Facebook or a sender of email.

You have enormous power as a woman, no matter your race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status.

You have enormous power as woman who birthed a child, adopted a child, or loves a child.

You have enormous power as a woman no matter who you are or what you do, and?  It’s time you used your voice to speak up for those who need support, those who need a hand, or those who just really need to know they’re not alone.

So take a stand. Speak up about something, even if it’s a tough subject.  I loved what Kelly Wickham said about leaning in and speaking out, even when it’s not easy.

Share a hashtag like #bringbackourgirls or share photos of your red balloons for Ryan. Donate to Amanda’s Army to support a fellow mom who is starting her battle with cancer–and then share the link with others.

Talk about it at the bus stop or on the sidelines of your kid’s soccer practice.  Email a link to your own mom, your mom’s group, or the moms in your neighborhood. Remind them of how good it feels to participate in something larger than themselves.

Encourage your own children to solicit soap donations for the Global Soap Project, to host a toy sale where donations go to a local shelter, or to simply start a neighborhood exercise program, getting families healthy.  All it takes is one person to get the ball rolling. One person can make a big difference.

 

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You are where it's at5.  you are where it’s at

Another Mom 2.0 takeaway is that you, as a mom and primary caregiver for your family, are the bomb diggity.  We always knew that, but now more than ever, the brands are living and breathing it, too.

Brands want to help you. They want to support you during this crazy parenting job, and they want to make your life easier.  

A few cool things some rockstar companies are doing to help you:

  • Whirlpool’s got some awesome coming down the road (ahem. . .  cough, cough. . . ) that will help you get kids involved in kitchen chores, and their new French Door 4-Door Fridge that is seriously flexible enough to adapt to any family.  You’ll love it.  They’ve even got a new microwave with an automatic popcorn sensor so your popcorn won’t burn. Check out my little instagram video of it.
  • Bing has created a Bing in the Classroom program where you can use their ad-free safe search and earn tablets for your kid’s classroom.  They’re making it so easy to keep your kids safe and tech-happy, that it’s nuts.
  • Fandango is on the road to creating a ton of awesome, easy to digest, content on their site that will help parents choose the best movies for their family.
  • National Geographic is creating ExpeditionsFamily Expeditions, even–that are designed to bring families together in engaging, exciting, life-changing adventures.  No planning needed on your part, mom. Just pick a destination and date!  Not up for traveling? Check out the continually improving NatGeoKids site.
  • The National Sleep Foundation is doing all they can to provide moms with resources they need to get the best possible rest (goodness knows we need it!), and Kidde wants moms to rest easy knowing their house is safe thanks to their new 10 year smoke alarms.

Curious and want to learn more? Follow hashtags–#fridgie or #letsbond or #natgeofamilycontest or #talkearly or #evolution or #mom2summit– to learn more.

That’s it.

Five biggie things I’m sharing with all of my mom readers because I heard the messages loud and clear this past weekend.

Want a bit more about Mom 2.0?  Check out some of my photos here:

 

Or check out the entire Mom 2.0 album here.

More to come on what I learned–I cannot wait to share!

 

fyi: Huge and happy thanks to my friends at Whirlpool for sending me to this conference, for supporting my learning there, and for  all they’re doing to help make every mom’s job that much easier.  This is a sponsored post, but as always, my opinions are all my own, influenced only by my experience as an educator and parent. 

getting kids to love reading with a literacy club: LITClub

get kids to love reading litclub teachmama.com.png

get kids to love reading  litclub  teachmama.com.pngThis post about getting reluctant readers to love reading is written by Ali Dent of Courage on the Edge of Tomorrow.

Thank you, Ali, for this incredible post!

____________________

  • Getting Kids to Love Reading with a Literacy Club–LITClub, by Ali Dent

Reading doesn’t come easy to everyone. Is there hope for those of us who would rather be on the playground, soccer field, or climbing a tree?

How important is it for our children to enjoy books?

We have an innate hunger for STORY.

What happens to this craving when reading is difficult, as it was for my daughter who has dyslexia, or as it was for me as a child, because I measured myself against my peers who read much faster than I did? Most of the time, it gets stuffed down inside, and we forget we ever took pleasure in the magic of a story. My daughter believed she couldn’t. I decided I wouldn’t. However, our appetite didn’t die; it went into hiding.

Like a pet rabbit in a home full of hunting dogs, it lurks around in the heart and mind. Now and again, it sneaks out of its hole, hoping to find a solution. Disappointed, it retreats back into the shadows, wishing for a way to enjoy the light without fear.

 

2012, The Hobbit Dinner and a Movie

 

With high school looming in my daughter’s future, we needed a solution that would allow her to read, comprehend, and interpret the classic novels on her high school reading list. In middle school, I read a lot of her books aloud to her, but the high school reading load felt overwhelming to both of us.

After a great deal of prayer, we discovered an answer that met her reading goals and turned out to be a way to satisfy a reluctant reader’s craving for stories.

Whether a child’s avoidance of books is from diagnosed reading issues, or a habit of choosing to do other things instead, a literature club can meet your child’s hidden craving for story.

 

get kids to love reading | litclub

Literature club was the answer to our prayers. It was the solution to Matti’s reading difficulties. We set out to get the books read on time and, hopefully, retain some comprehension. To our surprise, we got way more than we bargained for. Matti accomplished her reading list, understood the books, was able to interpret them, and she made lifelong friends.

It’s been 12 years since that first literature club started. Since then, I’ve seen shy, avid readers transform into confident public speakers (discussions and project presentations draw them out of their shells). Kids who are more interested in sports and electronics than a really good story transform into kids that say, “Mom, if we have to drop an activity, please don’t let it be literature club.”

LITClub kids experience books in a unique way. A literature club is a monthly activity that places a high value on the social needs of children and their parents. This entices the kids to give reading a chance. Interacting with family and friends is important to children. Moms need the camaraderie, too. Hanging out with their friends and sharing a meal together make literature club acceptable, even in the beginning, to those who think their moms have lost their minds when they tell them they are joining a classical book club. In a short period of time, the experience changes their opinion about reading.

LITClub gives the kids something to look forward to. Sure, they had to read an old book before coming to the meeting. They also had to prepare a project. They make this sacrifice, concluding, “The work is a small sacrifice to spend an exciting evening with my friends.” Hanging out is enough motivation during the first two or three months to keep the kids coming back.

get kids to love reading | litclub

After 2, 3, or 4 books, the kids get hooked on more than the social time. They find out that talking about the stories is a lot more interesting than they had imagined. They find themselves looking forward to what their friends have to say about the book, in comparison to their own thoughts. Most kids enjoy batting around thoughts, ideas, and opinions with each other. At first, the kids think that presenting a project to a group is either intimidating, or pointless. It doesn’t take them long to look forward to this part, too.

5 reasons moms love the outcome!

1.  LITClub kids become skilled in rhetorical conversations. When our kids reach adulthood, they will be in relationships with people who aren’t like them. They need to know how to talk with others in away that doesn’t cause a fight. Literature club provides a platform for the kids to express their thoughts about BIG ideas and practice their responses to people who might oppose them. In literature club, we do this through book conversations. In addition, at least once a year, the kids have an opportunity to participate in a formal round-table discussion. After reading Animal Farm, the kids were divided into two teams. One side argued for socialism, the other team for free market trade. In this way, the kids learned a lot about themselves. They realized that they had strengths and weaknesses when put on the spot conversationally. In the end, practicing in a round-table forum, whether casually or formally, equips LITClub kids to talk to others about their faith and lifestyle in a respectful and effective way.

2.  LITClub provides a stage for kids to learn how to be friends with people that are similar to them and different from them. They learn how to discuss their differences, instead of becoming enemies because they don’t know how to love others who aren’t like them.

3.  LITClub kids’ written and spoken communication skills are honed through project creation and presentation. Projects are geared to be fun and require thoughtfulness to complete. The Denver, Colorado middle school club read Death Be Not Proud. Lee, the facilitator, gave them this project: If you were given the news that in 6 months you will be leaving this earth and life as you know it, what kind of important-things-I-want-to-do-in-life list would you come up with? Kind of a bucket list, but preferably not ‘I’d make sure I go to NASCAR or visit Disney World’ (although maybe those could be at the bottom of your list).

So, in other words, if the Lord were to announce to you that He will be here in 6 months to take you Home, what MEANINGFUL and IMPORTANT things would be on your bucket list? Make the list real for you (not everyone has to make sure they witness to 600 people or kiss the Pope’s ring).

get kids to love reading | litclub

 

4.  Projects are designed to mature the kids’ hearts and minds. Another tough, but very fruitful project that stretches the kids’ minds and hearts is the monologue project. After reading Uncle Tom’s Cabin, the kids were asked to choose a character and write a monologue from the character’s viewpoint.

The kicker was that the monologue had to defend slavery from the character’s worldview. Imagine how absurd slavery is, how much you hate it. Then imagine putting yourself in the shoes of one of those characters and writing a speech from that vantage point. This exercise not only educates, it changes us in a positive way. By stepping into the life of another person, seeing things from his perspective, we become more compassionate and able to love. Writing this type of project, and then presenting it before a group, sharpens speaking skills, while simultaneously building confidence.

5.  LITClub kids’ critical thinking skills are stirred up through planning and implementing cool projects. These projects are less crafty, and more interactive, like pretending to be a news reporter and interviewing a character, or creating an original board game based on the plot of the story, with strategy based on symbols and motifs. Critical thinking is the ability to think in a circular fashion that spirals deep and wide, as opposed to a linear train of thought.

Imagine an idea that is brought to light in a conversation, a newspaper, magazine, news program, or on the radio. Linear thinking hears it and jumps to the first conclusion that comes to mind, and either owns that conclusion, or accepts the commentator’s conclusions without question. Circular thinking, which we sometimes call rhetorical or Socratic conversation, is less quick to jump to conclusions. Circular thinking takes time to listen to the other side. It ponders past, present, and future, and weighs the costs and outcomes.

    • LITClub thinkers learn to ask questions.
    • LITClub thinkers learn and respect for others.
    • LITClub thinkers learn to listen.
    • LITClub thinkers learn patience.

In the end, LITClub thinkers desire to know and love others more than they want to prove a point. This opens up conversations, whereas linear conversations tend to end abruptly and, often, are never broached again.

It might seem that a reluctant book lover would turn up his nose to all of this. My daughter thought she wouldn’t make it through her reading list. I wondered if I would be up for the task. Some kids push against the idea of a LITClub because they are introverts. The idea of presenting a project to a group is terrifying. Another child may insist that he just can’t corral his brain long enough to read a whole book. Regardless of a child’s reason for digging in his heels, hang tough. When it’s all said and done, he will be so grateful to you for the gift of literature club.

How do you transform reading into an experience?

If you would like to share this amazing process with your children, there is a handbook called The LITClub, Transforming Reading into an Experience. All the work is already done for you. It starts out with an explanation of the club, and ends with four classic book studies, along with all the tools you need to enjoy your very own literature club experience.

You might want to try it out before you buy. If so, you can download this free eBook, Transforming the Hunger Games into an Experience. This eBook, completely free, includes a quick-start guide to the literature club experience, a themed menu, a completely ready-made discussion guide, and a project guide.

If you have questions, send a message to Ali Dent.

Thank yoAliDentu, thank you, THANK you, Ali, for sharing your worldview conversations expertise–and totally cool idea with us!

Ali Dent is an author and story lover. She grew up in Georgia and was educated at Berry College, where her heart for writing was trained and nurtured. She currently resides in Texas with her family.  Check out her book, The LitClub, on Amazon. 

 

 

 

This post is part of our new Rockstar Sunday posts.  Each week, I will highlight one ‘rockstar’ in the parenting and education field.  These posts? Seriously awesome.

Have something you’d like to share that in some way relates to fun learning, school, technology, education, or parenting? For a short time we’ll be accepting Rockstar Sunday guest posts.

rockstar sunday promo teachmama

The response to our Rockstar Sunday feature has been overwhelming. I am in awe of the ideas, submissions, and shares!

Having been in the blogging space for 5+ years, we know for sure that our readers are always up for fresh and fun ideas on literacy, math, technology, parenting, and learning in the every day. They love crafts, hands-on teaching ideas, printables, cooking with kids, and anything that makes their job as parents easier, better, and more fun.

You don’t have to have a blog of your own–just cool ideas to share! We look forward to hearing from you!

other posts in the series: