raising strong students: study habits for smart kids

raising strong students: study habits for smart kids | teachmama.com

raising strong students: study habits for smart kids | teachmama.comOnce your kids hit elementary school, things get a little bit crazy.

All of a sudden, your kids actually need to be at school on time.

All of a sudden, you’re buried under a mountain of papers, fliers, and notices.

All of a sudden, your kids have real homework.

All of a sudden, your kids get to buy lunch and play instruments.

All of a sudden, you feel overwhelmed and inundated with kid projects and activities.

In the blink of an eye, your little, innocent preschoolers are replaced by these big kids who have tests and assignments.  And it’s nuts.

So what we do now–as parents of elementary schoolers–really, truly makes a big difference in our kids’ long-term success in school.

It’s about setting up habits and routines that matter. If we want to raise strong students, we must start now.

And believe me, I know it’s not always easy.  Believe me. We are late nearly every single day, and we live a stone’s throw from the school.

But we’re working on it, and we’re trying.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Raising Strong Students–Study Habits for Smart Kids:

I’ve talked long and hard about how important it is for parents to do what they can to help build a solid foundation for learning for our kids–playing games with ABCs, talking about numbers, teaching the basics–so that they start their formal education on solid ground.

And I still stand by that for sure.

But it’s only half the battle.

The other half of the battle is all about establishing routines.  In order to raise strong students, we have to establish study habits for our smart kids. Early.

If you have no study habits to speak of at this point, don’t worry. Do. Not. Worry. Start tomorrow. Or start this Monday.

Here’s what has to happen: Kids do their jobs. Then you do your job. Pause. Then you both do your job again.

Bam. In more detail:

raising strong students study habits for smart kids 1

1.  Kids do their jobs. It’s their job to put their backpacks, coats, and shoes in the same place every single day.

And they should put their folders or assignment books and lunch boxes in the same place every single day.

 

raising strong students study habits for smart kids 2

2. Parents do their jobs. Your job is to look at their school folders and go through their papers.

Sign or fill out important forms and file everything that your kids do not need in a special folder for each child. Empty the folder every month, keeping things you want to save and recycling everything else.

raising strong students: study habits for smart kids

Pause. Kids relax for 15 or 20 minutes.  They have a snack.

They wash hands, put on their play clothes or soccer uniform or dance outfit–whatever they’ll need for an after school activity later.

They chill out while you get your work finished.

raising strong students study habits for smart kids  3

 

3.  Jobs again. Kids’ biggie job is homework.  Your job–especially when kids are younger–is to make sure it’s completed in a satisfactory manner.

Sometime in the first hour that kids get home–after they’ve had a snack and have chatted with you about their day, played with the dog or did their quick chore–kids must finish homework in a quiet, distraction-free spot in the house. That way, it’s over. They don’t have to worry about it and can instead relax for the rest of the evening.

That’s it.  But parents must play an active role in establishing this routine. Really, they must.

 

raising strong students study habits for smart kids 1

Some helpful hints to make it work? 

  • Keep homework in the same place every day. Make it as distraction-free as possible.
  • Keep necessary supplies close at hand: paper, pencils, stapler, tape, crayons.
  • Keep kids responsible. Ask them to write down tests on a family calendar and post it so everyone can see. Kids put their work in folders when finished and pack backpacks for the next day.
  • Keep reminding kids that right now, school is their job and they want to do it well.
  • Keep reminding kids how much everyone appreciates their teacher’s hard work.
  • Keep it positive.
  • Keep it upbeat.
  • Keep consistent with the routine.
  • Keep it real. Some days, you need to stray from the routine. But get right back on it asap.

raising strong students study habits for smart kids 1

 

This is not easy, and I’ll be the first to admit that even though we run a pretty tight routine over here, I choose my battles. 

My kids’ socks never match. We’re the family running to school as the bell is ringing. I don’t always put sunscreen on their little faces for recess, and I often pack double desserts in their lunches but forget to include a drink.

They do forget library books and homework and sometimes wear flip-flops on days they have P.E.

And some days, even if I see that forgotten homework or book on the table, I physically cannot bring it to school because I have work and meetings and calls myself.  So it’s all a learning process. Believe me.

Bottom line is this: what we do now really counts. Because though we think we’re in the big game now, once our kids get to high school and college, then they’re in the big leagues. And if they have long-established study habits–study skills that work for them–then they’re more likely to be successful in the major leagues and later on in life.

We got this.  But parents, wee have to be in the game–every day.

 

What works for you? For your kids? For your family? How do you raise strong students with solid study habits?

I’d love to know! 

Want a little more info? NEA, National Education Association, has it covered. Visit nea.org/parents for more info on raising strong students.

 

fyi: This post reflects a collaboration with the National Education Association’s Raise Your Hand for Student Success campaign. All thoughts and opinions are, of course, my own.

earn money for your school (& get parents to events!): what you need to know

earn money for your school (& get parents to events!): what you need to know

This post is brought to you by VolunteerSpot & Bing for Schools.

 

earn money for your school and get parents to events  teachmama.com 2We are all so busy during the school year, it’s nuts crazy.

And it seems like the older our kids get, the more we have to juggle.

Many of us know how important it is for us to support our kids’ schools through fundraising, attending events, and volunteering–but it’s tough.

I know that especially when the kids were little, it was all I could do to get the kids to school, let alone worry about volunteering or fundraising.

I brought blinged-out waterbottles to a Teacher Appreciation luncheon because at the time, it was all I could do.

I’m thankful, now, that there are tons of ways that parents can help support their kids’ schools no matter what their situation is. But when it comes to organizing fundraisers and school events, there are some things that you have to keep in mind if you want the program to work.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Earn Money for Your School (& Get Parents to Events!)–What You Need to Know:

These may seem like two separate entities–fundraising and attendance–but they’re really pretty closely related when you think about it.

Above all, everything schools do when it comes to these things must be easy, inviting, and relevant

  • Keep it easy. Fundraisers must have simple directions. One or two steps.  Parents want to look at it, take some action, and be done with it. Events have to be easy–we don’t want to have to bring a million things to an event. We want to put it on our calendar and come as we are.
  • Inviting. Fundraisers have to be interesting and welcoming–things we want to look at and support–which is why the delivery is super important. That first impression makes a difference. So even simple flyers sent home from school with the kids should be appealing to the eyes and be free of spelling or grammatical errors.  Dates, times, and prices should be correct.
  • Relevant. We are more likely to buy products that will help us or our children in some way, shape or form.  Events have to be the same.  We want healthy kids and families, so let’s not sell a bunch of junk food or candy, right?

And for parents, the important thing to remember is that no matter where you are in the world–whether you’re working full-time or part-time, whether you’re married or single, whether you’ve got all kids in school or only one–there is a job for you.  There is some way you can help in your child’s school.

It’s critical that those parents doing the organizing and volunteering make it crystal clear that there is a need and a place for every parent at every school.

earn money for your school (& get parents to events!): what you need to know

Parents can:

  • help in the school media center;
  • make copies for teachers;
  • create bulletin boards;
  • collect Box Tops;
  • manage field trips;
  • organize assemblies;
  • serve on the board or as a committee chair;
  • attend events;
  • start your own after school club;
  • be a room parent;
  • share a board position with a friend;
  • manage the school website;
  • help with social media accounts;
  • work on the school garden or courtyard;
  • coordinate school and community partnerships;
  • manage dinners out restaurant nights;
  • organize Teacher Appreciation Week events;
  • and more.

The possibilities are endless, and of course, they depend on your school and your administration’s permission and interest.

It’s just a matter of sharing your strengths with your parent-teacher organization and using your own creativity to design a way you can help.

 

VolunteerSpot_Bing_470x246

Want to check out a few more ways you can earn money for your school and get parents to events? 

Check it out: How to Raise More Money for Your School–Boosting Fundraiser Turnout & Profits for your School-Parent Group

 

 

The webinar focus: Participants will learn how to pick the right combination of fundraisers for your school-parent group, boost turnout with Social Media, and ultimately RAISE MORE MONEY for school! With a special presentation by Bing, participants will also learn about easy ways parents can earn rewards for their school throughout the year to receive cutting edge education technology.

Facilitator: VolunteerSpot founder and CEO, Karen Bantuveris – seasoned speaker – school fundraising and parent-participation expert.

 

VolunteerSpot_Bing_470x246_v2

 

Go ahead–forward this post to your PTA or PTO board, to your room parent or fundraising chair, and start making some serious change in your school community!

And let me know–what’s your favorite way to help in your kids’ school–right now?

 

 

fyi: I am a longtime friend and supporter of VolunteerSpot who sponsored this post. As always, opinions and ideas are all my own, influenced only by my experience as a parent and educator. 

positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

positive affirmation notes for kids teachmama.com

post contains affiliate links

 

 

positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

Countdown’s on for the new school year, so I’ve been at work making a new set of lunchbox love notes.

In the past, we’ve covered joke notes, we’ve covered puzzle notes, fun fact notes, and travel inspired notes. We did a closer look notesKindergarten notes, and more jokes.

But this time I really wanted to so something that I think might help the kids in a different way as they move into the new year: positive affirmations for kids.

My girls have seen something similar when we made our Awesome Me boxes a while back, but Owen hasn’t.

And really, boys and girls both can stand to have some reminders of how awesome they are.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Positive Affirmation Notes for Kids–Lunchbox Love:

When I hear the words ‘positive affirmations’ I still can’t help but call to mind the old corny Saturday Night Live skits of Stuart Smalley’s I’m good enough. I’m smart enough. And doggone it, people like me.”

Nerdy. Silly. And soooooo funny.

positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

 

But as funny as I found–and still find–Stuart Smalley, I still believe that all that positive talk does help.

It really does.

Claude Steele back in the 1980’s focused on the effects of self-affirmation, and research today, though a bit mixed, votes predominantly in favor of the power of positive self-talk.

All kids can benefit from a little dose of positive self-talk.

positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

Especially as my oldest moves from a tween to a teen, I know she needs to hear that she’s awesome.

As my boy moves from a little guy to a tween (oooooh maaaay gosh. . . ), I know he needs to hear that he’s awesome.

And as my baby moves from a little fish to a bigger fish in the elementary school pond, I know she needs to hear that she’s awesome.

And they all need reminders about how to treat people and how to let others treat them.

positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

 

So I’m  hoping these Positive Affirmation Notes do just that–for each of them.

I printed three copies of each of the sheets, and there are 24 little notes on two sheets and one blank sheet so I can write in my own.

Though with our other notes, I usually give them all the same note on the same day, with these, I will mix it up–give each kiddo a specific note when it seems they need it most.

And it won’t be an everyday thing–I’ll add some of the jokes here and there, the holiday ones, and ones I write in as we go. The last thing I want them to be is annoyed with them. positive affirmation notes for kids: lunchbox love

lunchbox love- positive affirmations for kids _ teachmama.com

 

Here’s the pdf to download and use as you’d like: lunchbox love- positive affirmations for kids _ teachmama.com

Feel free to share.

The more kids who get these in their lunch, in their binders, or on their pillows at night, the better. Right?

 

Want a look at all of our lunchbox looooove notes? Here they are:

Need more awesome Back-to-School lunchy ideas? Definitely check out:

Here’s to a rockstar 2013-2014 school year and many more to come!

fyi: feel free to use the affiliate links below to make your kids’ lunches awesome

happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal (& giveaway!)

happy first day teacher flowers teachmama.com

As a paid Quaker Classroom Ambassador, I am eager to share information about Quaker Up For Classrooms.

 

Back to school time is here.happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal

And for many teachers and school employees, that means this is the busiest time of the year.  Busiest.

And with busy often comes stress.

For us, flowers often make a lot of that stress disappear.  Or. . . okay. If not disappear, then at least lessen.  A little.

So we share our de-stressors with those people with whom our kids will be spending the greater part of their little lives for the next 180 days: teachers.  

We love to share happy first day flowers with our new teachers, secretaries, or principal that first week of school–as a way to say thank you, welcome back, and let’s make it a rockstar year.

Though it may seem like this is a huge expense for us, it’s not. We’ve got some secrets to share.

And? I’ve got a super-fun, huge and awesome gift pack to give away to de-stress your life.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Happy First Day Flowers for Teachers, Secretaries, or Principal:

Whether your kiddos bring flowers for their teachers or the office staff, it doesn’t matter.

The idea is that we’re giving great people big thanks for doing hard work.  If your kids are hesitant to bring flowers for their teachers on the first day, it’s cool.

 

happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal

happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal | teachmama.com

 

First, we hit our local thrift store.

You got it. The under-used, often forgotten little gem that yields more surprises than you’d ever think. We love our thrift store, and we’re lucky that we’ve got a great one very close to us.

We buy enough small flower vases to cover everyone we need. Sometimes we’ve done just teachers. Some years we’ve done just office staff. It’s always different.

Often the vases are $. 25 to $ .50! And sometimes? They’re half price!

Serious deal.

 

happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal | teachmama.com

 

happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal | teachmama.com

 

Then we hit the grocery stores.

We buy several bouquets of flowers–whatever is on sale.

I’m betting that if money is tight for you and you hit a local florist and explain what you’re doing, they’d be quick to offer you some donations. Everyone loves teachers, and most people are thrilled to say thank you to them.

 

happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal | teachmama.com

 

happy first day flowers for teachers, secretaries, or principal | teachmama.com

And then? The fun part–the part that my kids love: filling the vases.

We do a mix of monochromatic and mixed arrangements, and really? They all look beautiful. How could they not?

We finish them off with a pretty ribbon, and they’re ready to go.

Our Happy First Day Flowers put a smile not only on our faces–but they put smiles on the recipients’ as well.  

 

These little ‘Happy First Day Flowers’ can be used any time of the year–and honestly, if they’re for no occasion, the better.

Everyone loves to get flowers. Everyone.

Especially surprise flowers.

 

—————————————————————

GIVEAWAY: Here’s what our Quaker gift pack looked like–yours will be similar!

 [comments are closed! Alicia C chosen winner by random.org]

GIVEAWAY: a ROCKSTAR Quaker Gift Pack that includes a variety of back-to-school items and Quaker products, including:

  • An LED Light-up Alarm Clock featuring a color-changing display, dual alarm clock perfect for busy families and music player compatible with any music-playing device
  • A Travel Oatmeal Bowl & Spoon Set for breakfast on-the-go
  • A Collapsible Lunch Container ideal for packing school snacks and lunches in one
  • A $25 Visa gift card to create your very own teacher appreciation gifts
  • A variety of specially-marked AdoptAClassroom.org Quaker products, including Quaker Instant Oatmeal, Life Cereal and Quaker Oatmeal Squares
  • Total giveaway value is approximately $92.00

Do you want to win a Quaker Gift pack? YES! Yes, you do!

 

All you have to do is leave a comment here telling me the name of your favorite teacher and why you loved him or her.

 

For extra entries, get creative, yo!!:

  • Share this post on your Facebook page–very easy!
  • Share this post with a friend (just tell me who you shared it with!)
  • Pin this post on Pinterest! (Use ‘pin it!’ button below post!)
  • G+  this post on Google+  (Use the G+ button below post!)

 

By entering this super-quick giveaway, you are demonstrating your understanding of and compliance with the Official Sweepstakes Rules.

HURRY! This giveaway ends Friday, September 5, 2014 at midnight ET. Winner will be chosen by ‘And the Winner is. . .’ and will be notified on or around 9/05/14.  Winner must respond within three (3) days of notification or forfeit the prize, in which case an alternate winner will be selected.  All Official Sweepstakes Rules apply.

 

fyi: Thank you to Quaker and AdoptaClassroom.org for creating this program. I am proud to be a Quaker Classroom Ambassador.  Quaker is providing the prizes for this program at no cost to me. This program is not administered or sponsored by Quaker or its affiliates, but solely by teach mama media, llc. 

 

easy ways to support teachers: back to school #QuakerUp

easy ways to support teachers: back to school #QuakerUp| teachmama.com

As a paid Quaker Classroom Ambassador, I am eager to share information about Quaker Up For Classrooms. easy ways to support teachers: back to school #quakerup | teachmama.com

 

Every child deserves the best possible start to his or her day, but sometimes that’s just not possible.

Kids come to school hungry, tired, and unprepared to learn not because they don’t want to–but because they have no other choice.

I remember all too clearly the struggles of my students and their families. And I remember all too clearly making sure I had enough supplies and snacks in my own classroom for students when they came to me for lunchtime or after school help.

I’m not alone.  Teachers spend more than $1 billion a year stocking their own classrooms, and they’re buying more than just school supplies.

In fact, three in five K-8 public school teachers say their students regularly come to school hungry, and as a result these teachers typically spend $37 per month from their own paychecks on food for their students.  Check out the 2013 No Kid Hungry report from 2013 for more startling facts.

The good news is that some really awesome companies are teaming up with really awesome organizations that are geared toward helping to support educators and make sure our nation’s students are fed.

Thank you, Quaker. And thank you Adopt a Classroom.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Easy Ways to Support Teachers–Back to School #QuakerUp: 

Buying food for my classroom was normal.

no kid hungry report 2013

Having a handful of extra supplies on hand was just something I did and something I remember most of my colleagues doing.

Looseleaf paper, pens, pencils, and notebooks. Crackers, granola bars, easy snacks. And I’m sure it’s no surprise–but I always had candy.  Little bursts of sugar to get my crew through class and to the next one.

It helped. I swear it did.

no kid hungry report 2013

We all want to do our part to help, but sometimes–especially when we have our arms full of our own little ones and money is tight, it’s difficult.

But there are easy ways to help. And by ‘easy’ I mean easy.

Ways you can help support teachers and their students just by doing what you’d normally be doing.  Buying products you’d normally buy.  I love it.

 

easy ways to support teachers 2 back to school #quakerup  teachmama.com

 

Quaker teamed up with AdoptAClassroom.org, and the partnership is powerful.

They’re working together to help teachers give their students the tools that can help students succeed.

Here’s how you can help: 

1. From July 7 to Sept. 30, purchase specially-marked Quaker products and enter the unique package codes online at www.QuakerUpForClassrooms.com.

Specially-marked Quaker products include:

  • Instant Quaker Oatmeal Maple Brown Sugar – 10 ct.
  • Instant Quaker Oatmeal Apples & Cinnamon – 10 ct.
  • Instant Quaker Oatmeal Regular – 10 ct.
  • Life Regular – 13 oz.
  • Chewy Chocolate Chip – 8 ct.
  • Chewy Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip – 8 ct.
  • Quaker Oat Squares Brown Sugar – 14.5 oz.
  • Life Cinnamon – 13 oz.

2. For every code entered online, Quaker will donate $1 to AdoptAClassroom.org up to $250,000 (minimum donation of $150,000) to help fuel classrooms across the country.

3. You’ll get a coupon for $1 off Quaker products (yay!).

 

easy ways to support teachers 2 back to school #quakerup 3 teachmama.com

 

Throughout the back-to-school season, I’ll also be sharing fun ways you and your family can prep for the upcoming school year – including teacher appreciation gifts and weekday breakfast tips.

To see more great back-to-school content from myself and the other Quaker Classroom Ambassadors and join the conversation with your own teacher appreciation stories, simply follow and share with your social networks via the #QuakerUp hashtag.

Please, friends, let’s do what we can to support it!

 

fyi: Thank you to Quaker and AdoptaClassroom.org for creating this program. I am proud to be a Quaker Classroom Ambassador.

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

make a library plan teachmama.com

Kids can be a little silly when it comes to picking out their own books at the library. create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

Where some can easily head right on over to the section they want, grab the books they want, and quickly find a quiet, cozy spot to read, others need . . . a little more direction.

And believe me, I’m all for giving kids time to browse the shelves, look around, relax and explore.

But really.

Our kids are so totally lucky to have so many books at their fingertips. Let’s give them a little direction so they can make the most of a trip to the library or to their school media center.

So after chatting with my pal Heather, and after my own kids’ crazy library book experiences, I decided to create a little Library Plan sheet.  They work.

They help give kids focus when they’re faced with All. Those. Books.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Create a Library Plan–Make the Most of a Trip to the Library:

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

 

I am not lying when I say that in Owen’s first three years in elementary school, he brought the same random book about dogs home at least ten times. It was a small, hardcover book about chihuahuas. And the fifth time it landed on our kitchen table, I asked why he brought it home again, and he said Because I like it.

I suggested that he try searching for other books about chihuahuas or even other books about dogs, but he said, No. I like this one.

 

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

 

The next year, when the book ended up back at our house, I gave him a little more nudging. You’re sure you love that book that much? I mean, haven’t you memorized it by now? 

He assured me that he just ‘really liked it’.

What I learned is that Owen doesn’t really care about his library books. He really doesn’t.

His goal? Grab a book. Bring it back to his class. Bring it home.  Maybe take it out of his backpack, depending on the day–maybe not. Bring it back to school. Put it in the library bin. Done. Bam.  Check it off. Gimme the next thing.

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

 

So rather than have him do the same thing this summer–a time when we usually hit the library as a family pretty often–I decided it was time to make the Library Plan.

Heather asked me a while ago if I had anything she could use for her boys, and really, I didn’t.

But now I do.

Small enough to fit inside a pocket or in the cover of a current library book, the Library Plan is super-simple.

The Library Plan is here to download if you so choose: library book plan

create a library plan: make the most of a trip to the library

library book plan  | help kids make the most of a trip to the library!

It includes a space for titles that kids might be seeking, authors, and subjects. And in case you do your book searching from home, accessing your library’s card catalog via the library website like we often do, there’s a spot for notes, too. I thought that would be a great space to write down call numbers, messages, anything you want to remember from your at-home searching.

The Library Plan also includes a ‘think’ spot where all sorts of topics and ideas are added. I’m hoping that as Maddy, Owen, and Cora fill out their Plan sheets, these ideas jog their minds and helps to give them some things to think about or look for at the library.

And that’s it.

We used the Library Plans as the first day of our Tabletop Surprises this week, and they worked.

Really, truly helped to keep our afternoon trip to the library focused and productive.

 

What do you think? Will these work for your kids or students? What should we add or change? Do let me know!

what to ask teachers before school lets out

what parents must ask teachers before school ends

what parents must ask teachers before school ends

For many, school has already been released for the summer (yay!).

But for others, summer is right around the corner.

That means we have a few more days (or weeks for some of us up here in the Northeast!) to wrap things up and tie together those loose ends.  It also means we have our kids’ teachers on hand for just a little bit longer. 

And really? That’s awesome because come that last day, we know our teachers are ready for a serious break. They deserve it.

But there are a few things parents should ask teachers before everyone locks up classrooms, logs off of email, and heads for the shore.

I shared those two important questions over on Scholastic Parents Raise a Reader blog:

2 Things Every Parent Must Ask Teachers at the End of the Year.

Check it out.

And then? Let me know what you think.

  • Would you ask something else?
  • What do you usually ask teachers? 
  • How should parents better approach this subject? 

 

bing in the classroom: 3 reasons parents will love it

bing in the classroom or at home teachmama.com

This post was created in partnership with Bing.

It is so hard to imagine a time without the internet search.bing in the classroom or at home | cover teachmama.com

Any time there’s a question in our house, the kids run to the computer: Search it! Search it! Let’s search for it!

But searching isn’t always safe, and it isn’t always easy–especially for curious and tech-savvy kids, and this is why I totally dig Bing in the Classroom.

Bing in the Classroom is a program designed to do a few things:

  1. establish ad-free, safe search for schools;
  2. provide ways for schools get their hands on tablets for students via Bing rewards;
  3. offer teachers (and parents!) tons of really cool (free!) lesson plans.

Sure, you’re a parent, and school’s almost out for the year. So why does this matter to you?

Seriously, I’m going to love Bing in the Classroom this summer, when my 10, 8, and 7 year olds are hangin’ around the homefront each and every day.

It will provide for us a ton of resources to use to keep the kids’ learning fresh, exciting, and interesting over the summer.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  •  Bing in the Classroom–3 Reasons You Will Love it (even this summer!):  Learning about the program now gives you a few solid weeks to learn about Bing in the Classroom and share it with your school’s administration or technology team so that they can implement the program next school year.

And? Like I said, Bing in the Classroom gives you a ton of things to do this summer.

Take a minute to see how it works:

Show support for #adfreesearch!

How will I use Bing in the Classroom this summer? 

I’m a huge fan of providing kids with tons of cool things to do to stretch their brains and flex their creativity throughout the summer, and two big pieces of the Bing puzzle can do just that:

  • Free Teaching Tools: The premise behind the Common Core aligned resources available on the site is that parents or teachers can spend only about 10 minutes each day helping students learn to navigate the wilds of the internet, through amazing visuals and thought-provoking prompts.

Simply make your way to the Teaching Tools page.

bing in classroom: 3 reasons you will love it at home this summer | teachmama.com

Then enter your search perimeters, or you can just browse all resources for a certain age.  

The activity that caught my eye is below. Some are Power Point, some are Word docs, and some are mixed media. I love the detail, the options, and the focus on one powerful image, not to mention the link to Common Core at the end of each lesson.

I’m confident that this summer an activity or two each week will be engaging and interesting for Maddy, Owen, and Cora.

http://www.bing.com/classroom/teachingtools

 

  • Bing Searches: I love, love, love the Bing searches, and I think the photos on the main screen are perfect for getting kids interested in learning.

The photos rock. And the fact that you can mouse over all parts of the photo and learn fun facts is awesome.

bing in the classroom why parents will love it in summer

The Bing homepage looks like this. . .

bing in the classroom why parents will love it in summer

. . . and when you click more info, you get the skinny on the location and photographer. Every day.

bing in the classroom why parents will love it in summer

Love this.

Always, always, always you want to go to your settings tab once you log into your Microsoft account so that you can properly adjust your search mode.

Though these settings are never 110% completely foolproof, Bing’s safesearch filters are pretty close:

bing in the classroom for summer | teachmama.com

My plan for this summer, among other things for our Tabletop Surprises, one day a week I’ll just leave the photo up on our Intel AIO Touchscreen or Chromebook and let the kids go free.   Along with some internet search help tips and some guided practice, hopefully after the summer the kids will be ready for the new school year!

 
fyi: This post was created in partnership with Bing.  Affiliate links are used in this post. 

quick, cool teacher appreciation gifts

quick, cool teacher appreciation gifts | teachmama.com

Teacher Appreciation Week is here.quick, cool teacher appreciation gifts | teachmama.com

Teacher Appreciation Week is a time to give a little something extra to all of the teachers in your life, whether your kids are in preschool, elementary school, middle, or high school. 

You do not need to go crazy here. Teachers are thankful for any simple token of appreciation.

And if you’re anything like me, you’re a little bit behind in just about everything in life.

This parenting thing is hard.  And add in activities, work, meetings, and a very busy spouse, life is, well. . . busy.

So this year, though I would have loved to have worked hard with the kids to make something crazy cool like our flower pens, butterfly pens, or fingerprint note cards for teachers, we just didn’t have the time.

Instead, we found a quick, cool teacher appreciation gift that I am sure our kids’ teachers will love because it is definitely something they’ll use.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Quick, Cool Teacher Appreciation Gifts: We were rockin’ the yard sale front this weekend. It’s that time of the year, so I always have my eye out for a few things–my must-have’s from yard sales–and I found one of ’em.

We spotted a brand, new Scrabble game, and I grabbed it for fifty cents.

$.50.

50¢.

Bam.

quick, cool teacher appreciation gift | teachmama.com

I wasn’t sure how we’d use it, but I had seen tons of super-cute ways of using Scrabble tiles that I thought it might come in handy for a last-minute, quick, cool teacher appreciation gift. And they did.

Maddy, Owen, Cora and I talked and talked about how we could use them. We considered:

  • Scrabble tile necklaces  (nah)
  • Scrabble tile bracelets (nope)
  • Scrabble tile bookmarks (but how?)
  • Scrabble tile pencil holders (yikes. not enough time. . . )
  • Scrabble tile tissue box covers (nah)

But nothing seemed right.

quick, cool teacher appreciation gift | teachmama.com

quick, cool teacher appreciation gift | teachmama.com

So when the kids were at school yesterday, I ran to our local Home Goods store, much like a TJ Maxx or the like, and I grabbed three super-cute wooden desktop filers, similar to this unfinished desktop filer.  I know that most any teacher can find a way to use something like this.

And very simply, I hot-glued the teachers’ names onto the holders.  The kids loved them.

quick, cool teacher appreciation gift | teachmama.com

quick, cool teacher appreciation gift | teachmama.com

 

They were 110% sure their teachers would love them, and I think they’re correct. With a kid-made thank you card placed in the slot, they’ll be cool teacher appreciation gifts that we’re pretty sure the teachers will use.

They’re super-simple and quick to make, but the added personalization touch makes them pretty special.

And really, with teacher appreciation gifts, you want to give teachers something that they’ll use.  For all their hard work and dedication, they deserve as much as we can give them.

 

fyi: The teachmama.com youtube channel is all about sharing quick teaching tips, reading strategies, and parenting tricks with parents and caregivers. It’s about empowering parents to be the best teachers they can be for their children. Subscribe here so you don’t miss a thing!

 

What are some of your go-to gifts for teacher appreciation day?  I’d love to hear your ideas!

 

fyi: affiliate links are used in this post. . . use them, and we over here at teachmama.com get a teeny, tiny percentage of your sale. thanks so much, friends!! 

 

Follow amy mascott @teachmama’s board school & teacher appreciation on Pinterest.

teachmama
 

Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge

Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge | teachmama.com

sponsored post

 

 

 

Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge | teachmama.com

When I was teaching, I always had a bulletin board full of opportunities for my students to win contests, write essays, submit poems, and receive accolades outside the classroom.

It’s so important for kids–and parents!–to realize that there are hundreds of cool contests running all the time.

Hundreds of dollars waiting to be won. Fab prizes and cool travel opportunities if kids just take some time to share their smarts with the world around them.

And so many of our kids are crazy smart, devising solutions to age-old problems that burden many and even working hard now to design answers to issues that may arise down the road.

Do you have a young tinker–belle or beau–on your hands?

A smartypants middle-schooler who may need a little something to get him through spring break?

A creative, outside-the-box thinker who may have found the solution to an environmental issue in your neighborhood?

A kid who may find a good way to put $25,000 to use if he or she wins?

I’ve got just the thing:  Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge.

Here’s the skinny. . .

  • Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge:

Here’s what you need to know. . .

Who:  Contest is open to middle school students

What:The Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge is the nation’s premier science competition for middle school students.

Why: It targets students in the years when research indicates their interest in science begins to fade and encourages them to explore scientific concepts and creatively communicate their findings.

Where:Young Scientist Challenge site

When:  Deadline for applications is April 22, 2014.

How:  Middle school students are create a 1-2 min video communicating the science behind a possible solution for an everyday problem. Based on the video entry, 10 finalists are chosen to work with a 3M scientist during a summer mentorship to create an innovation that will be presented to a panel of judges at the final competition at the 3M Innovation Center in St. Paul, Minnesota in October. WOW, right?

 

 

Check out the video for a bit more about the contest, and do pass this post on to friends, family, and schools. I know that so many kids would enter–if they only knew about it.

And how cool is this: past challenge winners have gone on to speak in front of members of Congress! Winners have also worked with the nation’s top scientists, participated in the White House Science Fair, met the President and pursued academic careers in the sciences. I love it.

Read through the complete rules and details on the competition website.

Chat with the competition folks over on their Facebook page or tweet with them on twitter:

And if your super-smart, totally cool middle schooler enters?  Let me know!! 

 

fyi: This is a sponsored post. Many thanks to my friends at Discovery Education for asking me to share news of this important and totally cool contest; as always, my opinions are my own, influenced only by my experience as an educator and a parent. 

stand up for yourself: at work, home, and school

stand up for yourself at work, home, school teachmama.com

stand up for yourself at work, home, school | teachmama.comThe following guest post is written by Carmen Blyth, of The Teacher Whisperer blog, a place for teachers with a story to tell.

Though I know that not every person who reads this blog is a teacher, I think this post is relevant even for all adults.  Sometimes even as adults, we need a little reminder to stand up for ourselves, no matter the situation–in the classroom, in the workplace, in volunteer organizations, in families, or in groups of friends.

We need to stand up for ourselves so that we can be good role models for our kids.

Are you being treated the way you deserve to be treated?  Are you treating others the way they deserve to be treated?

As parents, our interactions with other adults is a crazy-important model for how our kids view the world and what is expected, what is right, and what is the norm.

Let’s make sure we’re doing the best we can as a decent model for our kids at work, at home, and at school. Right?   Right.

——————————

  • Standing Up For Yourself–Being Bullied by Other Teachers, by Carmen Blyth

Yes, it happens! And no, ignoring it won’t make it go away. It’ll just make things worse–for you!

What does being bullied mean?

Being bullied by other teachers, means being treated in a disrespectful manner, repeatedly and intentionally.  It can mean being ignored by colleagues, gossiped about, shouted at at meetings or told your input is not valued.  If intentional and sustained, these types of disrespectful actions constitute bullying. And these examples are just the tip of a very large iceberg.

Being reasonable, logical, and having goodwill and a team approach will not work with a bully.  Being ‘nice’ or ‘fair’ is also not an option.

So what can you do? Seemingly very little, but you can do something to stop the bullying and maybe even get the bully permanently out of your work space!

Here’s what you do:

1. Make a detailed record of the incident(s). Include the date, day, time, place who was involved, names of any witnesses and what actually happened (write what was actually said or done if you can remember).

2. Make a written complaint to your line manager (your supervisor/team leader for example). You must detail the event and who was involved. Keep the wording as calm and collected as possible so there is no chance of being called ‘emotional’ or ‘over the top.’ Make sure to ask what the school policy on bullying is and the time line for action to be taken. Require at the very least a formal apology.

3. Send a cc to the principal (or supervisor, if you are not a teacher). This is super important, as it will ensure that the complaint isn’t simply brushed aside.

4.  Follow up. Follow up with the principal if you do not hear from your line manager within 24 hours.

Click here to see a sample written complaint. All names and the situations described are fictitious.

 

Birdcage & Puppet

Thank you, Carmen, for sharing a post on an important–and not always easy–topic.

The TEACHER WHISPERER is a blog dedicated to teachers telling their stories, stories that will make us better teachers. Tweet me @teacherwhispers

 

Looking for more information about bullying?

Check out these blog posts: 

Stop by and follow these great educational Pinterest boards: 

 rockstar sunday promo teachmama

The response to our Rockstar Sunday feature has been overwhelming. I am in awe of the ideas, submissions, and shares!

Having been in the blogging space for 5+ years, we know for sure that our readers are always up for fresh and fun ideas on literacy, math, technology, parenting, and learning in the every day. They love crafts, hands-on teaching ideas, printables, cooking with kids, and anything that makes their job as parents easier, better, and more fun.

You don’t have to have a blog of your own–just cool ideas to share! We look forward to hearing from you!

other posts in the series: